TIGER

Journal Articles: 29 results
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Mapping of Environmental Samples across College Campuses  Kathleen L. Purvis-Roberts, Harriet P. Moeur, and Andrew Zanella
In this laboratory experiment, students take environmental samples (concentrations of nitrogen dioxide) and geospatial coordinates with a global position systems unit at various locations around campus, map their data on a geo-referenced map with geographical information systems software, and compare their results to those observed by governmental agencies.
Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Moeur, Harriet P.; Zanella, Andrew. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 1691.
Applications of Chemistry |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Laboratory Computing / Interfacing |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy
Puzzling through General Chemistry: A Light-Hearted Approach to Engaging Students with Chemistry Content  Susan L. Boyd
Presents ten puzzles to make chemistry more interesting while reinforcing important concepts.
Boyd, Susan L. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 619.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry |
Gases |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Periodicity / Periodic Table |
Stoichiometry |
VSEPR Theory |
Atomic Properties / Structure
What Is Your Mental Picture of Ordinary Air?  Richard W. Ramette and Dale K. Haworth
Students differ widely in their conceptions about the nature of air.
Ramette, Richard W.; Haworth, Dale K. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 834.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
Steel Wool and Oxygen: A Look at Kinetics  James Gordon and Katherine Chancey
An experimental method is described to study the kinetics of the reaction of the iron in steel wool with molecular oxygen. A calculator-based data collection system is used with an oxygen gas sensor to determine the order of the reaction with respect to oxygen. Using the graphical method, students determine that the reaction follows first-order kinetics with respect to oxygen.
Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 1065.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Kinetics |
Oxidation / Reduction
Greenhouse Gases and Non-gray Behavior  J. C. Jones
Greenhouse gases feature in many courses in applied chemistry as well as in courses on environmental science, atmospheric chemistry, and so on. We hear a great deal about such matters from the media. A more classical topic which first-year chemistry students will learn about in the physical chemistry component of their program is the black body concept and the StefanBoltzmann law. Recently in teaching about greenhouse gases to MSc students I have thought of a link between the topical and classical matters that is pedagogically interesting and might be of value to others teaching in this subject area.
Jones, J. C. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 837.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor  James Gordon and Katherine Chancey
A new detection method is applied to a classic experiment in which gaseous atmospheric oxygen in a test tube is reacted with the iron in steel wool to produce rust. A gas pressure sensor interfaced to a calculator-based data collection system was used to measure the percent of oxygen in the air as the reaction proceeded. The results from the calculator-based experiment were compared to the results from a more traditional water-measurement experiment. The average percent of oxygen obtained using the calculator system was 19.4  0.4%.
Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 286.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Oxidation / Reduction |
Reactions
Fractional Distillation of Air and Other Demonstrations with Condensed Gases  Maria Oliver-Hoyo and William L. Switzer, III
This demonstration builds upon the commonly performed liquefaction of air not only to show the presence of nitrogen and oxygen, but also the presence of two other components, carbon dioxide and water. Several extensions are suggested: one to show boiling point elevation in solution and another to show the elevation of both boiling point and sublimation point with pressure. No special apparatus is required permitting presentations to audiences in a variety of settings. These demonstrations give the opportunity to discuss properties of gases, solution chemistry, and phase equilibria.
Oliver-Hoyo, Maria; Switzer, William L., III. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 251.
Gases |
Qualitative Analysis |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Separation Science
On the Buoyancy of a Helium-Filled Balloon  John E. Harriman
It is shown by expansion of the exponential in the barometric formula that the forces due to pressure acting on a balloon are of the form (PV/RT)Mg and that results agree with those suggested by Archimedes principle. Einstein's equivalence principal provides an answer to what balloons will do in an accelerated car.
Harriman, John E. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 246.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Physical Properties
Water in the Atmosphere  Joel M. Kauffman
None of eight college-level general chemistry texts gave a mean value for water in the atmosphere, despite its being the third most prevalent constituent at about 1.5% by mass as vapor and about 2% if clouds and ice crystals are included. The importance of water as a greenhouse gas was omitted or marginalized by five of the eight texts. An infrared spectrum of humid air was determined to demonstrate that water vapor, because of its higher concentration, was more absorptive than carbon dioxide. The cooling effect of clouds, or other influences on the Earth's albedo, were not mentioned in most of the texts. These pervasive errors should be corrected in new or future editions of textbooks.
Kauffman, Joel M. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 1229.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Green Chemistry |
IR Spectroscopy
Mass Spectrometry for the Masses  Jared D. Persinger, Geoffrey C. Hoops, and Michael J. Samide
In this article, we describe an experiment for an introductory chemistry course that incorporates the use of mass spectrometry for sample analysis. Several different air samples are collected that represent various chemical processes, and the composition of the air sample is predicted on the basis of known chemical principles. A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer is used to analyze these samples, and the relative quantities of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, and argon are calculated. On the basis of the data, the hypothesized sample composition is validated.
Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey C.; Samide, Michael J. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 1169.
Mass Spectrometry |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Green Chemistry |
Nonmajor Courses |
Oxidation / Reduction |
Photosynthesis |
Gases
Why Does a Helium-Filled Balloon "Rise"?  Richard W. Ramette
The article is a lighthearted, conversational exploration of the microscopic basis for Archimedes principle. The principle is discussed in terms of molecular collisions and density gradients in a gravitational field.
Ramette, Richard W. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 1149.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Physical Properties
A Novel Experiment for Fast and Simple Determination of the Oxygen Content in the Air  Metodija Najdoski and Vladimir M. Petrusevski
The reaction between nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen is used for determination of the oxygen content in the air. The nitrogen dioxide thus produced is dissolved in water. The volume decrease of the gas enables quick and accurate enough determination of the O2 content. The results of 20 measurements give %O2 = 21.04  0.63.
Najdoski, Metodija; Petrusevski, Vladimir M. J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 1447.
Gases |
Qualitative Analysis |
Quantitative Analysis |
Atmospheric Chemistry
Determination of the Oxygen Content of Air  Per Christian Braathen
Determining the oxygen content of air using vinegar and steel wool.
Braathen, Per Christian. J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 1410.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Quantitative Analysis
Relative Humidity  R. Bruce Martin
Daily we hear reports of relative humidity, yet most students remain unfamiliar with its import. This short article defines and describes the concept at several levels. A new, general interest, isobaric plot directly indicates the dependence of relative humidity on temperature.
Martin, R. Bruce. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1081.
Consumer Chemistry |
Gases |
Nonmajor Courses |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Atmospheric Chemistry
The Persistence of the Candle-and-Cylinder Misconception  James P. Birk and Anton E. Lawson
There is a persistent misconception that when a lighted candle is supported in a container of water and a closed cylinder is lowered over the candle, the candle is extinguished after a time by complete consumption of the oxygen in the cylinder, with a volume change corresponding to the amount of oxygen in the air. This misconception has appeared in the literature periodically for many years. Here, we present a number of experiments that refute this misconception.
Birk, James P.; Lawson, Anton E. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 914.
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Quantitative Analysis |
Reactions
Thermal Physics (and Some Chemistry) of the Atmosphere  Stephen K. Lower
An exploration of how the temperature of the atmosphere varies with altitude can serve as a useful means of illustrating some important principles relating to the behavior of gases and to the absorption and transformation of radiant energy.
Lower, Stephen K. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 837.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
The Environmental Chemistry of Trace Atmospheric Gases  William C. Trogler
Information regarding the composition of trace gases in the Earth's atmosphere, changes in these amounts, their sources, and potential future impact on the environment.
Trogler, William C. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 973.
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry
Proper glove box etiquette   Roper, Gerald C.
Author defends his activity to a critique raised in an earlier letter in this Journal.
Roper, Gerald C. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, 520.
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry
Gas reactions in plastic bags: Relating laboratory observations to the atomic-molecular model  Robinson, Maurice; Barrow, Gordon M.
Carrying out chemical reactions in Ziplock bags to investigate a variety of chemical concepts.
Robinson, Maurice; Barrow, Gordon M. J. Chem. Educ. 1992, 69, 1026.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases |
Reactions |
Acids / Bases |
Oxidation / Reduction |
Photochemistry |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Physical Properties
The density and apparent molecular weight of air  Harris, Arlo D.
Simple procedure for determining the density and apparent molecular weight of air.
Harris, Arlo D. J. Chem. Educ. 1984, 61, 74.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Physical Properties
Enduring distributions that deny Boltzmann  Nash, Leonard K.
Examines two practical steady- state distributions: the atmosphere and its lapse rate and the ocean and its vertical quasi-uniformity.
Nash, Leonard K. J. Chem. Educ. 1984, 61, 22.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
The titration of air with nitric oxide: An application of Gay-Lussac's law of combining volumes in a general chemistry experiment  Everett, Kenneth G.
Gay-Lussac's law of combining volumes is demonstrated through the reaction between NO and the oxygen in air.
Everett, Kenneth G. J. Chem. Educ. 1982, 59, 802.
Titration / Volumetric Analysis |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
Gasoline vapor: An invisible pollutant  Stephens, Edgar R.
An apparatus and procedure to demonstrate the substantial contribution vaporized gasoline makes to hydrocarbon pollution.
Stephens, Edgar R. J. Chem. Educ. 1977, 54, 682.
Physical Properties |
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry
Ultraviolet absorption of ozone  Driscoll, Jerry A.
A demonstration of the absorption of ultraviolet radiation by ozone.
Driscoll, Jerry A. J. Chem. Educ. 1977, 54, 675.
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry
Great spray can debate  Bassow, Herb
A curriculum scenario that takes the problems raised by the technological, economic, and political contexts of the fluorocarbon controversy as its point of focus.
Bassow, Herb J. Chem. Educ. 1977, 54, 371.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Enrichment / Review Materials |
Applications of Chemistry
Student flowmeters and an air pollution experiment  Kohn, Harold W.
Using glass wool as an absorbent for atmospheric contaminants and three simple devices for measuring flow rates of gases.
Kohn, Harold W. J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, 643.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Laboratory Equipment / Apparatus
Questions [and] Answers  Campbell, J. A.
Eight questions requiring the application of basic principles of chemistry.
Campbell, J. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, 624.
Enrichment / Review Materials |
Applications of Chemistry |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
Cloud Caps on High Mountains  Stevenson, Philip E.
The formation of cloud caps on high mountains illustrates cooling in an adiabatic expansion and the change in vapor pressure of a liquid with temperature.
Stevenson, Philip E. J. Chem. Educ. 1970, 47, 272.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Applications of Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Thermodynamics
Demonstration notes: Oxygen in air  Glanz, Joseph
Explains that the popular method of demonstrating the percentage volume of oxygen in air is fraut with errors.
Glanz, Joseph J. Chem. Educ. 1963, 40, A477.
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry