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ACS Resources: 23 results
Flying is a Breeze  
This interactive game was developed as part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site. In this game, students control the flight of a hot air balloon as it flies over a mountain.
Applications of Chemistry |
Gases
Air  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with air. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Gases
Gases  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with the properties of gases. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Gases
Pasta with Pep  
In this activity, students place noodles in soda pop and noticed that bubbles formed on the noodles. Bubbles formed on the noodles because of the carbon dioxide gas in the soda pop. Once the carbon dioxide has a surface, such as the noodle, to form on, it can build up and form bubbles, and cause the noodle to float to the surface.
Gases
A Gas Sudsation  
In this investigation, students add some soap solution to an empty bottle. They add some baking soda and vinegar. A chemical reaction between the vinegar and the baking soda produces carbon dioxide gas. The interaction between the gas and the detergent creates bubbles. These bubbles have more staying power than the bubbles created by just vinegar and baking soda. With the right amount of each ingredient, students should be able to control the reaction and get the amount of bubbling they are looking for.
Gases |
Reactions |
Acids / Bases
Air ? It?s Really There  
Are gases made of matter, or are they empty space? In this activity students place plastic cups full of air into an aquarium full of water. Air in the cups prevent water from entering. Pour the air from one cup to another and the water is displaced.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Avogadro's Air Rockets  
In 'Avogadro's Air Rockets', students use air pressure to launch small projectiles. An empty soda bottle is used as the launcher. The projectiles are fashioned from a straw, with paper cone fixed to its top. As the bottle is squeezed it forces air out, pushing the straw rocket up and away. Students note the force effects of the air pressure.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Bubble-o-meter  
In this exercise, students make a bubble solution and use it to adds a film on the mouth of an empty bottle. As the bottle is heated, the gas inside expands, making a bulge in the film at the top of the bottle. Gases, like most solids or liquids, take up more space (expand) when,they are heated. The opposite is also true. Most solids, liquids,,and gases take up less space (contract) when they are cooled.,The difference is that gases expand a lot more than liquids or solids,when heated and contract a lot more when cooled.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Bubbles  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with the properties of bubbles. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Cartesian Diver  
The Cartesian Diver toy has been known to scientists,for hundreds of years. In this activity students make this science toy,and use changing pressure to make it move.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Full of Hot Air  
An empty bottle has its cap removed. The rim of the mouth is moistened, and the cap is placed upside down on the mouth. The bottle is placed in a container of hot water. The cap jiggles and then falls off. ,Just because the bottle looks empty doesn't mean that it is empty. The bottle actually contains air which is made up of different gases. When the bottle is placed in the hot tap water, the heat energy makes the gases in the air expand. The air expands in all directions and pushes against the inside of the bottle, knocking the lid off.
Gases |
Liquids |
Physical Properties
Gas Pressure ? It?s in the Bag  
In ""Gas Pressure- It's in the Bag"", plastic baggies are used to demonstrate the effect of pressure. As air is blown into the baggie the pressure increases and the amount of push on a load of books increases. In a similar way, the more air there is in a car's airbag, the more pressure there is. It is harder for the air bag to be pushed down, which gives the passengers more protection.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Gases ? Expanding Possibilities  
Students place a straw in the mouth of an empty plastic bottle and seal it with clay. The straw is tilted into a container of water. As the empty bottle is heated, bubbles appear in the container of water. ,In this activity, the warmth from the water moves into the air,inside the bottle. The pressure inside the bottle increases,causing the gas to push on the air in the straw. It even pushes,on the water in the cup. This is what happened when you saw,the bubbles in the water.
Geochemistry |
Gases |
Physical Properties
Good Vibrations?  
Students investigate how sound travels differently through air or solids.
Solids |
Gases |
Physical Properties
Heat ? Energy Extraordinaire  
In this activity, students learn about the effect of heat on air. An empty soda bottle is dipped into a soap solution, creating a thin soap film on the mouth of the open bottle. Then the bottle is placed, bottom down in a pan of hot water. Students observe the bubble at the mouth of the jar grow as the air inside is heated. Heat is a form of energy. The heat energy from the water makes the molecules in the air inside the bottle move faster and spread further apart.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Pop Rockets  
In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore chemical reactions by launching a film canister rocket powered by gas from an effervescent antacid table.
Reactions |
Acids / Bases |
Gases
Seeing Is Believing  
In this activity, students make small parachutes from a handkerchief, string and some weights. The parachute ?traps? air under it. The air is made up of extremely tiny particles called molecules. These molecules,are gases. Their names are nitrogen, oxygen, argon, water vapor, carbon dioxide, plus a few other gases. With all those molecules making up the air, there is a lot that helps hold a parachute up as it falls through the air.
Materials Science |
Gases
Solids, Liquids & Gases  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with properties of solids, liquids and gases. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Solids |
Liquids |
Gases
A Condensation Sensation  
Students investigate condensation. When ice is added to air containing water vapor, the vapor condenses more rapidly than at room temperature. When water exists as a gas (water vapor) the molecules are very far apart. But when water vapor or any gas is cooled, the molecules slow down and do not move so far apart from each other. As a gas is cooled, and the molecules move closer together, they can change back into a liquid. This process is called condensation. Decreasing the temperature increases the rate of condensation.
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Gases
Colorful Candy Clouds  
In this activity, students learn about wind patterns and air currents by observing a model system made from colored candies and water. The candy is placed in water and students follow its colored dye as it dissolves and moves through the water.
Gases |
Transport Properties |
Atmospheric Chemistry
Avogadro?s Bubbly Adventure  
Small amounts of gases are soluble, or dissolve, in water.,Two of these gases are oxygen and carbon dioxide. For,example, carbon dioxide gas is what gives soft drinks their ?fizz?.,And fish use oxygen dissolved in water for their body chemistry,,much like humans do. When there is not enough oxygen dissolved in,the water, fish can ?suffocate?. In this activity students study the,solubility of gas in water at different temperatures to see whether temperature changes this property.
Gases |
Solutions / Solvents |
Precipitation / Solubility |
Stoichiometry
Eggstra-ordinary Gas Pressure  
Students place an egg between two inflated zip-closing bags. When dropped from a height the egg manages to survive, intact. By inflating and then sealing the zip-closing bags, students created gas,pressure inside the bags. There was nowhere for the air inside the bag,to go. The more air added, the greater the gas pressure inside the bag. Because of this gas pressure inside the bags, the bags,served as a pillow for the egg. The egg did not break because it never,hit the ground. As long as the egg is secured by the gas ?pillows,? it will,not break.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
Gases |
Physical Properties
States of Matter  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with states of matter. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Solids |
Liquids |
Gases