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ACS Resources: 14 results
Crossword: Chemistry Keeps Us Clean  
Thiscrossword puzzle, part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site, has students match answers, to various statements about the chemistry of cleaning, into a crossword puzzle.
Applications of Chemistry |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Micelles |
Noncovalent Interactions
Word Find: Chemistry Keeps Us Clean  
This word search puzzle, part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site, has students find topics related to the chemistry of cleaning.
Applications of Chemistry |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Micelles |
Noncovalent Interactions
Paper Cover Up  
In this activity, students cover some parts of white paper with wax. When painted with dark paint, the color does not stick to the waxed parts. This is like coatings used to protect teeth.
Noncovalent Interactions
Stained Glass Glue  
In Stained Glass Glue, students place drops of food coloring on Elmer's glue and investigate what happens when they touch the surface with bit of detergent. Elmer's glue has water in it plus a much longer, more flexible chemical called polyvinyl acetate. These long flexible molecules are moving around in the water like intertwined strands of boiling spaghetti. When the food coloring drops are added, they are prevented from spreading out much by the combination of water and polyvinyl acetate molecules. When the detergent is added, detergent molecules help to break up this combination and allow the food coloring to flow more easily.
Noncovalent Interactions
Magic Sand  
Magic Sand is a children's toy with interesting features. Magic sand is made from regular sand (silicon dioxide) that has been dyed and coated with tiny particles of pure silica, and exposed to a special chemical treatment making it hydrophobic. The coating on the,outside of the magic sand pushes the water away. Magic Sand placed in water comes out perfectly dry.
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
All Wet  
In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore some of the properties of solvents and solutes. Liquid-liquid solutions are explored to see if all liquids are soluble in water.
Solutions / Solvents |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions
Dissolving's Sweet Solution  
If a solid dissolves in one liquid, will it necessarily dissolve in other liquids? In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore some of the properties of solvents and solutes.
Solutions / Solvents |
Precipitation / Solubility |
Noncovalent Interactions
If Mixing Is Urgent, Try Detergent  
Normally, oil and water do not mix together very well. This fact makes it hard for water to wash away oily dirt. Detergent can help water and oil mix together. This mixing helps the water wash the oil,away. In this activity students observe the effect of detergent on water and oil.
Precipitation / Solubility |
Solutions / Solvents |
Noncovalent Interactions
Racedrop Raceway  
In this activity, students create a 'racetrack' picture and cover it with a piece of wax paper. They add a drop of water and attempt to make the water drop follow the racetrack by tilting the paper. This works because the water beads up on the waxed surface, rather than wetting it, like regular paper. This illustrates how polar water does not mix with the nonpolar wax.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Testing Water?s Skin  
In this activity, students drop water onto a penny, counting how many can be added before they spill off the side. Then the experiment is repeated, only this time a small amount of detergent is placed on the surface of the penny. Students learn about surface tension and the effect of detergents on surface tension.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Water ? Clearly Unique  
In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore some of the unique properties of water. Quick and easy tests show students the differences between water and similar looking liquids.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Water Walkers  
In this activity, students explore surface tension in water. Some insects literally walk on water. They can do this because of their light weight and broad support. The surface tension in the water is great enough to support the insects. Students in this activity try to fashion their own water walkers made from aluminum foil.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Zippy Zappy Boats  
In this activity, students make small plastic boats from a piece of Styrofoam. One has dish soap added to its back edge. Adding soap disrupts the arrangement of the water, and the water molecules near the boat have a harder time sticking to one another, making it possible for the boat to go forward.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Evaporation Exploration  
Fabrics like cotton can soak up sweat and water, and they dry slowly. So as a person sweats, cotton clothes can become wet and sticky, even heavy?they hold on to the water they soak up. New high-tech fabrics in modern sports clothing are different. They have the ability to pull moisture away from the skin and carry it to the outer surface of the clothing, where it can evaporate more easily and cool you off. In the following activity, students compare the rate of evaporation of water from cotton and a paper towel, which will act like a high-tech fabric.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Noncovalent Interactions