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ACS Resources: 28 results
Word Scramble: Home Sweet Home  
This word scramble puzzle, part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site, has students find topics related to the chemistry of the home.
Applications of Chemistry |
Materials Science
Word Scramble: Sports  
This word scramble puzzle, part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site, has students find topics related to the chemistry of the sports.
Applications of Chemistry |
Materials Science
Maze: Bouncy Ball  
This puzzle, part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site, has students follow a maze to collect various objects required to complete a science activity for making a bouncy ball (http://portal.acs.org:80/portal/fileFetch/C/WPCP_011041/pdf/WPCP_011041.pdf).
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Meg A. Mole's Bouncy Ball Factory  
This interactive game was developed as part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site. In this game, students try to find the optimum mix of materials for producing a bouncy ball.
Applications of Chemistry |
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Milli's Magnificent Bubble Solution  
In this activity, students mix their own bubble solutions using various combinations of dish soap, glycerin, sugar, water and other ingredients. Each solution is tested to see which gives the best results.
Materials Science
Plane Smarts?  
In this open-ended investigations, students are given various materials and asked to create the best folded model airplane possible.
Materials Science
Today?s Tape ? Terrific but Tacky  
The sticky stuff used to make tape is different from glue because it doesn't need to dry up and harden in order to work. Tape sticks well even though it stays kind of gummy or tacky. In fact, after a very long time, when it does dry out, it doesn't stick well at all. In this activity students investigate the glue used on tape and learn about its properties. A simple scheme for testing the tape is presented and students use it to assess the stickiness of various types of tape.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Building  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with properties of building materials. They are written for the 4-6th grade level. A dozen activities provide insight on how building materials relate to the characteristic properties of matter.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Characteristics of Materials  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with characteristic properties of matter. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
From Goo to Glue  
In this open-ended activity, students try to create a glue from combinations of household materials, including flour, water, gelatin, and milk. Students learn how the properties of materials can affect its ability to bond surfaces together.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Playtime Paint  
In this activity, students create their own paint, using sidewalk chalk and various solvents. Much depends on choosing the correct solvent to make a suspension of the pigments.
Materials Science |
Colloids
Poke but Don?t Soak  
In this activity students try to poke a wooden skewer through an inflated balloon without popping it. With a little vegetable oil along the length of the skewer, students carefully poke it through the thick, unexpanded material near the knot of the balloon, and then out through the thickest part at the other end of the balloon. How does it work? The stretchy polymers in the skin of the balloon fit tightly around the skewer and prevent the balloon from popping.
Polymerization |
Materials Science
Seeing Is Believing  
In this activity, students make small parachutes from a handkerchief, string and some weights. The parachute ?traps? air under it. The air is made up of extremely tiny particles called molecules. These molecules,are gases. Their names are nitrogen, oxygen, argon, water vapor, carbon dioxide, plus a few other gases. With all those molecules making up the air, there is a lot that helps hold a parachute up as it falls through the air.
Materials Science |
Gases
Spaghetti Strength  
In ""Spaghetti Strength"", Spaghetti ( a type of polymer,called a carbohydrate) is used to support a load of penny weights. Although its bonds are strong, it could only support a certain number of pennies. When there was too much strain on the spaghetti strands, it caused the chemical bonds to break. There is strength in having,several strands of spaghetti stuck together. This allows more pennies to be supported.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Structured for Strength  
In Part 1 a meter stick is turned on its edge like a beam. When placed on its edge and used as a beam, a piece of wood can hold up a lot of weight because there is a lot more material to resist bending when the beam is oriented in this way. The taller the beam, the more weight it can handle without bending and eventually breaking.,In Part 2, egg shells hold up a Fair amount of weight because each one acts like a dome. The shape of a dome gives it a lot of strength. When weight is placed on the top of a dome, the force is spread away from the center along the curved surface of the dome in all directions so the dome can handle the weight.,
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
The Bookland Bridge  
In this open-ended activity, students are asked to investigate how a single piece of paper can be fashioned between two stacks of books. Students use various folding schemes to produce the strongest structure.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Visit with Dr. O?Brien  
In this article, future chemistry Meg A Mole interviews a scientist to explore their careers, including how they decided to become a scientist and provide information on what they actually do as part of their job. Suitable for grades 4-6.
Applications of Chemistry |
Materials Science
A Plaster Master or a Plaster Disaster  
This hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, explores the properties of plaster of Paris. Students try preparing plaster of Paris using various solutions, including water, salt, and vinegar.
Reactions |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Avi's Sensational Salt Dough  
In Avi's Sensational Salt Dough students learn about the characteristic properties of brick-like materials. A mixture of flour, salt and water is prepared and its characteristics are noted. The mixture is baked and the changes that occur are noted.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science |
Reactions
Bouncing Ball  
In this activity students create a toy bouncing ball from glue, borax and cornstarch. The resulting ball demonstrates some of the properties of polymers.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Diapers ? The Inside Story  
In this activity students investigate a polymer found in a surprising place-inside baby diapers. Sodium polyacrylate is a polymer that is able to absorb up to 300 times its own weight of water. This polymer makes disposable diapers much more efficient at holding liquid waste.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Goop to Go  
In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore some of the properties of unusual liquids. Students make two kinds of polymer 'goo' and investigate their properties.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Milli?s Insulation Investigation  
To keep homes comfortable inside and save energy, insulation is placed in the walls, where it works like a jacket around the house. The most common types of insulation used in homes are fiberglass and cellulose. Fiberglass is extremely fine strands of glass. Cellulose insulation is a pulpy, puffy form of recycled newspapers, boxes, and waste paper. In this activity students test several different materials to find out which one is the best insulator.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science |
Transport Properties
Visit with Dr. Williams  
In this article, future chemistry Meg A Mole interviews a scientist to explore their careers, including how they decided to become a scientist and provide information on what they actually do as part of their job. Suitable for grades 4-6.
Applications of Chemistry |
Materials Science |
Women in Chemistry
Visit with Mr. Cordova  
In this article, future chemistry Meg A Mole interviews a scientist to explore their careers, including how they decided to become a scientist and provide information on what they actually do as part of their job. Suitable for grades 4-6.
Applications of Chemistry |
Minorities in Chemistry |
Materials Science
Visit with Mr. Mislang  
In this article, future chemistry Meg A Mole interviews a scientist to explore their careers, including how they decided to become a scientist and provide information on what they actually do as part of their job. Suitable for grades 4-6.
Applications of Chemistry |
Minorities in Chemistry |
Materials Science
Visit with Ms. Helms  
In this article, future chemistry Meg A Mole interviews a scientist to explore their careers, including how they decided to become a scientist and provide information on what they actually do as part of their job. Suitable for grades 4-6.
Applications of Chemistry |
Women in Chemistry |
Materials Science
Visit with Ms. Wylie  
In this article, future chemistry Meg A Mole interviews a scientist to explore their careers, including how they decided to become a scientist and provide information on what they actually do as part of their job. Suitable for grades 4-6.
Applications of Chemistry |
Women in Chemistry |
Materials Science