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ACS Resources: 59 results
Maze: Bouncy Ball  
This puzzle, part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site, has students follow a maze to collect various objects required to complete a science activity for making a bouncy ball (http://portal.acs.org:80/portal/fileFetch/C/WPCP_011041/pdf/WPCP_011041.pdf).
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Meg A. Mole's Bouncy Ball Factory  
This interactive game was developed as part of a collection from the ACS 'Science for Kids' Web site. In this game, students try to find the optimum mix of materials for producing a bouncy ball.
Applications of Chemistry |
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
A Stickyometer  
Some substances are stickier than others. In this activity students investigate and measure the stickyness of various foods. They construct a device to help measure how sticky a substance is and then use it to evaluate three types of food.
Physical Properties
Density - Float or Sink  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with density. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Physical Properties
Different Slides ? Different Rides?  
This investigation of factors affecting friction has students sliding objects down various types of playground slides.
Physical Properties
Grip and Go!?  
Traction and grip depend on friction. The type of material and how it is textured have a lot to do with how much friction will be ,produced when the surface is rubbed against another. In this activity, students investigate how texture affects friction.
Physical Properties
Ground Breaking Idea  
In this activity, students create a model for studying soil erosion, based on the type of soil.
Physical Properties
How Sweet It Is  
In this activity, a can of diet soda and a can of regular soda are placed in a tub of water. The amount of soda in both cans are the same, yet the can of diet soda floats and the can of regular soda sinks. This happens because the contents of the regular soda is heavier than the contents of the diet soda. Students carry out a simple experiment to find out what is going on with the sodas.
Physical Properties
Let's Settle the Matter  
In this activity, students create a model for studying soil erosion.
Physical Properties
Make Your Own Sculpture Dough  
In this activity, students create a dough for making toy sculptures. When the ingredients are mixed together they display properties unlike any of the individual components.
Physical Properties
Milli?s Super Sorting Challenge  
In this open-ended activity, students are given the challenge of separating a number of materials, based on their physical properties. This is much like the challenge in sorting garbage for recycling. Students use magnetism, static charge, density and other factors to separate the mix.
Physical Properties
Rooting for Sink and Float  
A slice of carrot normally sinks in water. In this investigation students attempt to change this by adding salt to the water until it is more dense than the carrot. Will the carrot float? Students use the basic concepts of density to find out.
Physical Properties
Scratch and Slide!?  
In this activity, students learn about friction. Various surfaces are tested to see which ones produce the most friction.
Physical Properties
Today?s Tape ? Terrific but Tacky  
The sticky stuff used to make tape is different from glue because it doesn't need to dry up and harden in order to work. Tape sticks well even though it stays kind of gummy or tacky. In fact, after a very long time, when it does dry out, it doesn't stick well at all. In this activity students investigate the glue used on tape and learn about its properties. A simple scheme for testing the tape is presented and students use it to assess the stickiness of various types of tape.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Air ? It?s Really There  
Are gases made of matter, or are they empty space? In this activity students place plastic cups full of air into an aquarium full of water. Air in the cups prevent water from entering. Pour the air from one cup to another and the water is displaced.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Avogadro's Air Rockets  
In 'Avogadro's Air Rockets', students use air pressure to launch small projectiles. An empty soda bottle is used as the launcher. The projectiles are fashioned from a straw, with paper cone fixed to its top. As the bottle is squeezed it forces air out, pushing the straw rocket up and away. Students note the force effects of the air pressure.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Bubble-o-meter  
In this exercise, students make a bubble solution and use it to adds a film on the mouth of an empty bottle. As the bottle is heated, the gas inside expands, making a bulge in the film at the top of the bottle. Gases, like most solids or liquids, take up more space (expand) when,they are heated. The opposite is also true. Most solids, liquids,,and gases take up less space (contract) when they are cooled.,The difference is that gases expand a lot more than liquids or solids,when heated and contract a lot more when cooled.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Bubbles  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with the properties of bubbles. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Building  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with properties of building materials. They are written for the 4-6th grade level. A dozen activities provide insight on how building materials relate to the characteristic properties of matter.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Cartesian Diver  
The Cartesian Diver toy has been known to scientists,for hundreds of years. In this activity students make this science toy,and use changing pressure to make it move.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Characteristics of Materials  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with characteristic properties of matter. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Convection: A New Direction  
Heated rock material deep within the earth moves up and down in very slow moving patterns called convection currents. Convection current occurs when material is heated and becomes less dense than the material around it. The warm material moves up until it cools off and becomes more dense. Students study this using food coloring and hot water. , ,
Geochemistry |
Physical Properties
Fabulous Flubber  
In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore some of the properties of unusual liquids. First, students make 'slime' using Elmer's glue and a borax solution. They then use water soluble pens to explore how color interacts with the 'slime'.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties
Float or Sink  
It is wrong to think that light things float, while heavy things sink. For example, a heavy log will float down a river, but a light grain of sand will sink. How heavy an object is does have something to do with whether it will float or sink. But there is more to the story. In this activity students investigate what causes an object to float or sink.
Physical Properties |
Solids
Floating Fluids  
In 'Floating Fluids' students investigate the density of various liquids. While students are likely familiar with solids floating in liquids, they may have less experience with one liquid floating on another. If two liquids are insoluble in each other, and are of different densities, one will float in a layer atop the other.
Physical Properties |
Liquids
Friction ? A Hot Topic!?  
When you rub your hands together, the action of scraping the surface of your skin back and forth against each other causes ,the molecules in your skin to move a little faster. The faster that molecules move, the higher the temperature. So the friction of rubbing your hands together makes them feel warmer.
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry |
Physical Properties
From Goo to Glue  
In this open-ended activity, students try to create a glue from combinations of household materials, including flour, water, gelatin, and milk. Students learn how the properties of materials can affect its ability to bond surfaces together.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Full of Hot Air  
An empty bottle has its cap removed. The rim of the mouth is moistened, and the cap is placed upside down on the mouth. The bottle is placed in a container of hot water. The cap jiggles and then falls off. ,Just because the bottle looks empty doesn't mean that it is empty. The bottle actually contains air which is made up of different gases. When the bottle is placed in the hot tap water, the heat energy makes the gases in the air expand. The air expands in all directions and pushes against the inside of the bottle, knocking the lid off.
Gases |
Liquids |
Physical Properties
Gas Pressure ? It?s in the Bag  
In ""Gas Pressure- It's in the Bag"", plastic baggies are used to demonstrate the effect of pressure. As air is blown into the baggie the pressure increases and the amount of push on a load of books increases. In a similar way, the more air there is in a car's airbag, the more pressure there is. It is harder for the air bag to be pushed down, which gives the passengers more protection.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Gases ? Expanding Possibilities  
Students place a straw in the mouth of an empty plastic bottle and seal it with clay. The straw is tilted into a container of water. As the empty bottle is heated, bubbles appear in the container of water. ,In this activity, the warmth from the water moves into the air,inside the bottle. The pressure inside the bottle increases,causing the gas to push on the air in the straw. It even pushes,on the water in the cup. This is what happened when you saw,the bubbles in the water.
Geochemistry |
Gases |
Physical Properties
Good Vibrations?  
Students investigate how sound travels differently through air or solids.
Solids |
Gases |
Physical Properties
Heat ? Energy Extraordinaire  
In this activity, students learn about the effect of heat on air. An empty soda bottle is dipped into a soap solution, creating a thin soap film on the mouth of the open bottle. Then the bottle is placed, bottom down in a pan of hot water. Students observe the bubble at the mouth of the jar grow as the air inside is heated. Heat is a form of energy. The heat energy from the water makes the molecules in the air inside the bottle move faster and spread further apart.
Gases |
Physical Properties
Heat Up and Cool Down  
When heat makes the particles of a substance speed up and spread out, the substance takes up more room. If a substance stays the same weight but takes up more room, it is less dense. In this activity students investigate if less dense hot water floats or sinks in more dense cold water.
Liquids |
Physical Properties
Magic Sand  
Magic Sand is a children's toy with interesting features. Magic sand is made from regular sand (silicon dioxide) that has been dyed and coated with tiny particles of pure silica, and exposed to a special chemical treatment making it hydrophobic. The coating on the,outside of the magic sand pushes the water away. Magic Sand placed in water comes out perfectly dry.
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Slime & Goo  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with mixtures that are not traditional liquids. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties
Soil Sizes ? Some Surprises  
The size of soil particles is an important part of making soil either good or not so good at growing different kinds of plants. ,The smaller the particles, the harder it is for water to move through the soil. In this activity, students do a quick experiment to get an idea of the affect of different sizes of soil particles in a sample of soil. ,
Agricultural Chemistry |
Physical Properties
Spaghetti Strength  
In ""Spaghetti Strength"", Spaghetti ( a type of polymer,called a carbohydrate) is used to support a load of penny weights. Although its bonds are strong, it could only support a certain number of pennies. When there was too much strain on the spaghetti strands, it caused the chemical bonds to break. There is strength in having,several strands of spaghetti stuck together. This allows more pennies to be supported.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Speed Sinking!?  
Students place a peanut in a container of water and time how long it takes to sink. They repeat this with smaller pieces of peanut to see how this affects the result.
Physical Properties |
Chemometrics
Structured for Strength  
In Part 1 a meter stick is turned on its edge like a beam. When placed on its edge and used as a beam, a piece of wood can hold up a lot of weight because there is a lot more material to resist bending when the beam is oriented in this way. The taller the beam, the more weight it can handle without bending and eventually breaking.,In Part 2, egg shells hold up a Fair amount of weight because each one acts like a dome. The shape of a dome gives it a lot of strength. When weight is placed on the top of a dome, the force is spread away from the center along the curved surface of the dome in all directions so the dome can handle the weight.,
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Super Shrinkers  
In this activity, students use pieces of polystyrene plastic to make a 'super shrinker' toy. When this plastic is heated it shrinks dramatically. This artfully changes the piece students cut out and color.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties
The Bookland Bridge  
In this open-ended activity, students are asked to investigate how a single piece of paper can be fashioned between two stacks of books. Students use various folding schemes to produce the strongest structure.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
What Counts in Bounce  
Do all balls bounce? Most do, but how high a ball bounces depends on the material from which it is made and the temperature of the ball.,In the following activity, students compare the bounciness of warm and cold racquetballs to see if temperature makes a difference.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties
A Plaster Master or a Plaster Disaster  
This hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, explores the properties of plaster of Paris. Students try preparing plaster of Paris using various solutions, including water, salt, and vinegar.
Reactions |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Avi's Sensational Salt Dough  
In Avi's Sensational Salt Dough students learn about the characteristic properties of brick-like materials. A mixture of flour, salt and water is prepared and its characteristics are noted. The mixture is baked and the changes that occur are noted.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science |
Reactions
Bouncing Ball  
In this activity students create a toy bouncing ball from glue, borax and cornstarch. The resulting ball demonstrates some of the properties of polymers.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Diapers ? The Inside Story  
In this activity students investigate a polymer found in a surprising place-inside baby diapers. Sodium polyacrylate is a polymer that is able to absorb up to 300 times its own weight of water. This polymer makes disposable diapers much more efficient at holding liquid waste.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
Get the Facts on Fats  
Butter and oil are both made from fat. In this activity they are compared with each and also with water. The butter is made from cow's milk which makes it animal fat. The oil is made from corn, making it plant fat. Students learn that both types of fat are made from almost identical chemicals arranged in very similar ways. These similarities cause them to soak through a brown paper bag, feel greasy, and not dissolve in water.
Lipids |
Physical Properties |
Food Science
Glitter Slime  
In this activity students make 'slime' from glue and water. The glue and water mixture contains long chains of a polymer called polyvinyl acetate. When you add the borax solution, it links the long polymer chains together, changing the liquid into a slimy glob. When you add the glitter to the slime, it stays there and does not easily come back out.,Students investigate how this slime is like mucus that we find in our bodies. Our natural mucus contains sugars and proteins, which are also polymers. Mucus protects many other parts of your body.
Applications of Chemistry |
Polymerization |
Physical Properties
Goop to Go  
In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore some of the properties of unusual liquids. Students make two kinds of polymer 'goo' and investigate their properties.
Polymerization |
Physical Properties |
Materials Science
A State Debate  
It?s not always so easy to say definitely that a substance is a solid, liquid, or gas. Some materials, like cornstarch mixed with ,water, can act more like a solid when treated a certain way and more like a liquid when treated a different way. Shaving ,cream seems to have an unusual state because it is a liquid soap with a lot of gas bubbles mixed in it. The gas makes it so ,thick and frothy that it keeps its shape and supports light objects like a solid. When you let the liquid from shaving cream evaporate, all that's left is the very light and thin solid. In this activity, students explore some characteristics of solids, liquids and gases.
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Colloids |
Physical Properties
Chemical & Physical Change  
A collection of activities that explore basic concepts dealing with chemical and physical change. They are written for the 4-6th grade level.
Acids / Bases |
Reactions |
Physical Properties |
Precipitation / Solubility
Eggstra-ordinary Gas Pressure  
Students place an egg between two inflated zip-closing bags. When dropped from a height the egg manages to survive, intact. By inflating and then sealing the zip-closing bags, students created gas,pressure inside the bags. There was nowhere for the air inside the bag,to go. The more air added, the greater the gas pressure inside the bag. Because of this gas pressure inside the bags, the bags,served as a pillow for the egg. The egg did not break because it never,hit the ground. As long as the egg is secured by the gas ?pillows,? it will,not break.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
Gases |
Physical Properties
Milli?s Insulation Investigation  
To keep homes comfortable inside and save energy, insulation is placed in the walls, where it works like a jacket around the house. The most common types of insulation used in homes are fiberglass and cellulose. Fiberglass is extremely fine strands of glass. Cellulose insulation is a pulpy, puffy form of recycled newspapers, boxes, and waste paper. In this activity students test several different materials to find out which one is the best insulator.
Physical Properties |
Materials Science |
Transport Properties
Put Proteins on Your Pro Team  
In this activity students learn about some of the properties of proteins by studying gelatin. Gelatin is made from the cartilage of cows and pigs and is a typical protein. The main protein in cartilage is collagen. The structure of collagen makes it very strong and flexible. This flexibility of collagen also gives gelatin elastic qualities when squeezed. Students investigate these and other properties of proteins in this investigation.
Proteins / Peptides |
Physical Properties |
Food Science
Racedrop Raceway  
In this activity, students create a 'racetrack' picture and cover it with a piece of wax paper. They add a drop of water and attempt to make the water drop follow the racetrack by tilting the paper. This works because the water beads up on the waxed surface, rather than wetting it, like regular paper. This illustrates how polar water does not mix with the nonpolar wax.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Testing Water?s Skin  
In this activity, students drop water onto a penny, counting how many can be added before they spill off the side. Then the experiment is repeated, only this time a small amount of detergent is placed on the surface of the penny. Students learn about surface tension and the effect of detergents on surface tension.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Water ? Clearly Unique  
In this hands-on activity, which is part of the ACS-Science for Kids collection, students explore some of the unique properties of water. Quick and easy tests show students the differences between water and similar looking liquids.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Water Walkers  
In this activity, students explore surface tension in water. Some insects literally walk on water. They can do this because of their light weight and broad support. The surface tension in the water is great enough to support the insects. Students in this activity try to fashion their own water walkers made from aluminum foil.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions
Zippy Zappy Boats  
In this activity, students make small plastic boats from a piece of Styrofoam. One has dish soap added to its back edge. Adding soap disrupts the arrangement of the water, and the water molecules near the boat have a harder time sticking to one another, making it possible for the boat to go forward.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions