TIGER

Journal Articles: 76 results
A New "Bottom-Up" Framework for Teaching Chemical Bonding  Tami Levy Nahum, Rachel Mamlok-Naaman, Avi Hofstein, and Leeor Kronik
This article presents a general framework for bonding that can be presented at different levels of sophistication depending on the student's level and needs. The pedagogical strategy for teaching this model is a "bottom-up" one, starting with basic principles and ending with specific properties.
Levy Nahum, Tami; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Kronik, Leeor. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1680.
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Covalent Bonding |
Ionic Bonding |
Lewis Structures |
Materials Science |
MO Theory |
Noncovalent Interactions
Helping Students Assess the Relative Importance of Different Intermolecular Interactions  Paul G. Jasien
A semi-quantitative model has been developed to estimate the relative effects of dispersion, dipoledipole interactions, and H-bonding on the normal boiling points for a series of simple, straight-chain organic compounds. Application of this model may be useful in addressing student misconceptions related to the additivity of intermolecular interactions.
Jasien, Paul G. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1222.
Chemometrics |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Physical Properties
Dancing Crystals: A Dramatic Illustration of Intermolecular Forces  Donald W. Mundell
Crystals of naphthalene form on the surface of an acetone solution and dance about in an animated fashion illustrating surface tension, crystallization, and intermolecular forces. Additional experiments reveal the properties of the solution and previous demonstrations of surface motion are explored.
Mundell, Donald W. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 1773.
Aromatic Compounds |
Liquids |
Molecular Mechanics / Dynamics |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Physical Properties |
Surface Science |
Noncovalent Interactions
"Concept Learning versus Problem Solving": Does Particle Motion Have an Effect?  Michael J. Sanger, Eddie Campbell, Jeremy Felker, and Charles Spencer
210 students were asked to answer a static, particulate-level, multiple-choice question concerning gas properties. Then they viewed an animated version of the question and answered the multiple-choice question again. The distribution of responses changed significantly after students viewed the animation.
Sanger, Michael J.; Campbell, Eddie; Felker, Jeremy; Spencer, Charles. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 875.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Qualitative Analysis |
Quantitative Analysis |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
What Are Students Thinking When They Pick Their Answer?  Michael J. Sanger and Amy J. Phelps
330 students were asked to answer a multiple-choice question concerning gas properties at the microscopic level and explain their reasoning. Of those who selected the correct answer, 80% provided explanations consistent with the scientifically accepted answer, while 90% of the students who picked an incorrect choice provided explanations with at least one misconception.
Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 870.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Qualitative Analysis
Molecular Handshake: Recognition through Weak Noncovalent Interactions  Parvathi S. Murthy
This article traces the development of our thinking about molecular recognition through noncovalent interactions, highlights their salient features, and suggests ways for comprehensive education on this important concept.
Murthy, Parvathi S. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 1010.
Applications of Chemistry |
Biosignaling |
Membranes |
Molecular Recognition |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Chromatography |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Polymerization |
Reactions
Intermolecular and Intramolecular Forces: A General Chemistry Laboratory Comparison of Hydrogen Bonding in Maleic and Fumaric Acids  Frazier W. Nyasulu and John Macklin
This article presents a simple laboratory experiment that is designed to enhance students' understanding of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding by demonstrating the comparative effect of these phenomena on some chemical and physical properties.
Nyasulu, Frazier W.; Macklin, John. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 770.
Acids / Bases |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Thermodynamics |
Titration / Volumetric Analysis
The Nature of Hydrogen Bonding  Emeric Schultz
Students use toy connecting blocks and Velcro to investigate weak intermolecular interactions, specifically hydrogen bonds.
Schultz, Emeric. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 400A.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Covalent Bonding |
Molecular Modeling |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Einstein Revisited  Leonard Fine
Examines Einstein's contributions to chemistry, particularly his work on the photoelectric effect, molecular dimensions, and Brownian motion.
Fine, Leonard. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 1601.
Quantum Chemistry |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Simple Dynamic Models for Hydrogen Bonding Using Velcro-Polarized Molecular Models  Emeric Schultz
This article describes the use of models that dynamically illustrate the unique characteristics of weak intermolecular interactions, specifically hydrogen bonds. The models clearly demonstrate that H-bonds can break and reform while covalent bonds stay intact. The manner in which the models form and break H-bonds reflects the geometric and statistical manner in which H-bonding actually occurs and is not contrived. The use of these models addresses a significant area of student misconceptions. The construction of these molecular models is described.
Schultz, Emeric. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 401.
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Molecular Modeling |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
A Supramolecular Approach to Medicinal Chemistry: Medicine Beyond the Molecule  David K. Smith
This article emphasizes a conceptual view of medicinal chemistry, which has important implications for the future, as the supramolecular approach to medicinal-chemistry products outlined here is rapidly allowing nanotechnology to converge with medicine. In particular, this article discusses recent developments including the rational design of drugs such as Relenza and Tamiflu, the mode of action of vancomycin, and the mechanism by which bacteria develop resistance, drug delivery using cyclodextrins, and the importance of supramolecular chemistry in understanding protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's and CreutzfieldJacob.
Smith, David K. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 393.
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Medicinal Chemistry |
Nanotechnology |
Proteins / Peptides
Intermolecular Forces as a Key to Understanding the Environmental Fate of Organic Xenobiotics  Ryan E. Casey and Faith A. Pittman
We have developed an environmental chemistry module that can be used in high schools or undergraduate nonscience courses to relate chemical structures and properties to the macroscopic behavior of environmentally relevant organic chemicals like pesticides, PCBs, and solvents. The module introduces the concepts of intermolecular forces, polarity, and partitioning to explain complex phenomena such as environmental transport and biomagnification of xenobiotics (human-made chemicals).
Casey, Ryan E.; Pittman, Faith A. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 260.
Nonmajor Courses |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Boiling Point versus Mass  Michael Laing
I am very pleased that Ronald Rich has written making these comments, because he is pre-eminent in this field, beginning with his early book, Periodic Correlations.
Laing, Michael. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 642.
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Liquids |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
Boiling Point versus Mass   Ronald L. Rich
Laing gave a useful examination of the boiling points of small molecules versus molecular mass. However, a molecule escaping from a liquid is not closely analogous to a satellite breaking free from the earths gravitational field with the requirement of a minimum escape velocity, such that the required kinetic energy is proportional to the mass of the satellite at that escape velocity.
Rich, Ronald L. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 642.
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Liquids |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
Why Does a Helium-Filled Balloon "Rise"?  Richard W. Ramette
The article is a lighthearted, conversational exploration of the microscopic basis for Archimedes principle. The principle is discussed in terms of molecular collisions and density gradients in a gravitational field.
Ramette, Richard W. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 1149.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Physical Properties
Purple or Colorless—Which Way Up? An Entertaining Solubility Demonstration  Trevor M. Kitson
Discrepant demonstration involving immiscible mixture of water colored with potassium permanganate and hexane.
Kitson, Trevor M. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 892.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Physical Properties
Laboratory Sequence in Computational Methods for Introductory Chemistry  Jason A. Cody and Dawn C. Wiser
Description of a four-week laboratory sequence that exposes students to instrumentation (FT-NMR, GC) and computational chemistry.
Cody, Jason A.; Wiser, Dawn C. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 793.
Chromatography |
Computational Chemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
MO Theory |
Molecular Modeling |
Molecular Mechanics / Dynamics |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
NMR Spectroscopy |
Gas Chromatography
Rubber Bands, Free Energy, and Le Châtelier's Principle  Warren Hirsch
Using a rubber band to illustrate Gibbs free energy, entropy, and enthalpy.
Hirsch, Warren. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 200A.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Thermodynamics |
Equilibrium
A Structure–Activity Investigation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport. An Interdisciplinary Experiment for the First-Year Laboratory  Kerry K. Karukstis, Gerald R. Van Hecke, Katherine A. Roth, and Matthew A. Burden
Investigation in which students measure the effect of several inhibitors (herbicides) on the electron transfer rate in chloroplasts and formulate a hypothesis between the inhibitor's activity and its structure as a means of using a physical technique to measure a chemical process in a biological system.
Karukstis, Kerry K.; Van Hecke, Gerald R.; Roth, Katherine A.; Burden, Matthew A. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 985.
Biophysical Chemistry |
Electrochemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy |
Aromatic Compounds |
Plant Chemistry
Boiling Points of the Family of Small Molecules CHwFxClyBrz: How Are They Related to Molecular Mass?  Michael Laing
Investigating the role of molecular mass in determining boiling points of small molecules.
Laing, Michael. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 1544.
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Liquids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Physical Properties
Stories to Make Thermodynamics and Related Subjects More Palatable  Lawrence S. Bartell
Collection of anecdotes regarding the history and human side of chemistry.
Bartell, Lawrence S. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 1059.
Surface Science |
Thermodynamics |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Applications of Chemistry
Assessing Students' Conceptual Understanding of Solubility Equilibrium  Andrés Raviolo
A problem about solubility equilibrium is presented as a resource for the evaluation of students; it involves macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic levels of representation, and allows one to assess whether students have acquired an adequate conceptual understanding of the phenomenon.
Raviolo, Andrés. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 629.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Equilibrium |
Precipitation / Solubility
Are Fizzing Drinks Boiling? A Chemical Insight from Chemical Education Research  Alan Goodwin
The suggestion that fizzing drinks are examples of liquids boiling at room temperature has proved to be controversial among both chemists and chemical educators. This paper presents a case for believing this everyday system to be a good example of a boiling solution and the consequent separation of carbon dioxide from the solution to exemplify fractional distillation.
Goodwin, Alan. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 385.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Equilibrium |
Gases |
Solutions / Solvents |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
Using a Computer Animation to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding of a Can-Crushing Demonstration   Michael J. Sanger, Amy J. Phelps, and Jason Fienhold
This paper reports some of the misconceptions that were identified from these students' explanations. As a result of these misconceptions, a computer animation depicting the chemical processes occurring in the can-crushing demonstration was created.
Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J.; Fienhold, Jason. J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 1517.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases
A Simple Protein Purification and Folding Experiment for General Chemistry Laboratory  Robert Bowen, Richard Hartung, and Yvonne M. Gindt
A simple procedure for the crude purification of a chromoprotein suitable for a general chemistry laboratory. The protein, phycocyanin, is easy to purify and very stable. It contains a chromophore that can serve to report the integrity of the protein structure: the chromoprotein is dark blue when the protein is folded in its native conformation, and it turns a very pale blue when the protein is unfolded or denatured.
Bowen, Robert ; Hartung, Richard; Gindt, Yvonne M. J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 1456.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Photochemistry |
Proteins / Peptides |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy
The Solubility of Ionic Solids and Molecular Liquids  C. Baer and Sheila M. Adamus
The solubilities of three ionic salts (NaCl, PbCl2, and KAl(SO4)2.12H2O) in water are measured at four temperatures. The concept of recrystallization is introduced as students cool a high-temperature solution and observe crystal formation. Spreadsheet calculations are performed with the group data, which are then graphed, and students observe the wide variance in solubility behavior for the three salts.
Baer, Carl; Adamus, Sheila M. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1540.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Laboratory Computing / Interfacing |
Liquids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Solutions / Solvents
London Dispersion Forces and "The Wave"  C. Jayne Wilcox
An analogy is presented likening London dispersion forces to "The Wave", a popular ritual performed by fans attending sports events in large stadia. Similarities between people in the stands and electrons in atoms are emphasized.
Wilcox, C. Jayne. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1301.
Noncovalent Interactions
Intermolecular Forces in Introductory Chemistry Studied by Gas Chromatography, Computer Models, and Viscometry  Jonathan C. Wedvik, Charity McManaman, Janet S. Anderson, and Mary K. Carroll
Students performing gas chromatographic (GC) analyses of mixtures of n-alkanes and samples that simulate crime scene evidence discover that liquid mixtures can be separated rapidly into their components based upon intermolecular forces. Each group of students is given a liquid sample that simulates one collected at an arson scene, and the group is required to determine the identity of the accelerant. Students also examine computer models to better visualize how molecular structure affects intermolecular forces: London forces, dipole-dipole interactions, and hydrogen bonding.
Wedvik, Jonathan C.; McManaman, Charity; Anderson, Janet S.; Carroll, Mary K. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 885.
Theoretical Chemistry |
Chromatography |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Gas Chromatography |
Molecular Modeling |
Forensic Chemistry |
Alkanes / Cycloalkanes |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Why Do Alcoholic Beverages Have "Legs"?  Todd P. Silverstein
After a sip of wine, "legs" of liquid typically run up and down the inside of the glass for many minutes. This phenomenon stems from the dipole-dipole intermolecular forces that are so important in understanding the physical behavior of aqueous solutions.
Silverstein, Todd P. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 723.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Learning Theories |
Alcohols |
Hydrogen Bonding
A Simple Demonstration of How Intermolecular Forces Make DNA Helical  Michael F. Bruist
The usage of stacked identical boxes can be used to demonstrate the helical shape of DNA by the effect of intermolecular forces.
Bruist, Michael F. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 53.
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Molecular Modeling
Boiling Point and Molecular Weight  Rich, Ronald L.
No relationship between boiling points and molecular weight.
Rich, Ronald L. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, A294.
Physical Properties |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Letters  
No relationship between boiling points and molecular weight.
J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, A294.
Physical Properties |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Loschmidt and the Discovery of the Small  Porterfield, William W.; Kruse, Walter
Translation of J. Loschmidt's "On the Size of Air Molecules", the earliest determination from experimental data of the size of an atom (with notes).
Porterfield, William W.; Kruse, Walter J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 870.
Enrichment / Review Materials |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
The "Collisions Cube" Molecular Dynamics Simulator  John J. Nash and Paul E. Smith
Design and applications for a large, three-dimensional atomic/molecular motion/dynamics simulator using forced-air blowers and ping-pong balls.
Nash, John J.; Smith, Paul E. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 805.
Laboratory Equipment / Apparatus |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Kinetic Theory of Gases   Kathleen Cornely-Moss
Sample questions to test student understanding of the kinetic theory of gases.
Cornely-Moss, Kathleen. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 715.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases
The Physical Reality of Molecules: They're Dense and They Move Around!  Silverstein, Todd P.
Diffusion of ink in water as it is heated to illustrate density and the atomic/kinetic theory.
Silverstein, Todd P. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 177.
Physical Properties |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
An Intermolecular Forces Study Using IBM PSL  Eckberg, Christine; Zimmer, John; Reeves, James; Ward, Charles
Procedure to investigate evaporative cooling for a family of straight chain alcohols.
Eckberg, Christine; Zimmer, John; Reeves, James; Ward, Charles J. Chem. Educ. 1994, 71, A225.
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Alcohols
Dynamic Computer Simulation of the Motion of Gas Molecules  Turner, Dean E.
165. Bits and pieces, 52. A program that simulates the motion of gas particles and illustrates the effects of temperature, mass, and volume.
Turner, Dean E. J. Chem. Educ. 1994, 71, 784.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases
Experiments for Modern Introductory Chemistry: Intermolecular Forces and Raoult's Law  Berka, Ladislav H.; Kildahl, Nicholas
Procedure that illustrates the liquid-vapor phase equilibrium of ideal and nonideal solutions.
Berka, Ladislav H.; Kildahl, Nicholas J. Chem. Educ. 1994, 71, 613.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Gas Chromatography |
Gases |
Liquids |
Equilibrium |
Solutions / Solvents
Molecular dynamics simulator  Matthews, G. Peter, Heald, Emerson F.
A review of a computer program that provides a display of molecular motion in a solid, liquid, or gas.
Matthews, G. Peter, Heald, Emerson F. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, 387.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
The kinetic molecular theory and the weighing of gas samples  Brenner, Henry C.
How is it possible to weigh gas samples since the molecules are constantly moving around and not always in contact with the floor of the container?
Brenner, Henry C. J. Chem. Educ. 1992, 69, 558.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases |
Physical Properties
Does a one-molecule gas obey Boyle's law?  Rhodes, Gail
Because the kinetic molecular theory provides a plausible explanation for the lawful behavior of gases, it should be treated in enough depth to show students that the theory accounts for all of the important aspects of ideal gas behavior.
Rhodes, Gail J. Chem. Educ. 1992, 69, 16.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Space-filling P-V-T models  Hilton, Don B.
Space-filling models help beginning students visualize the numerical aspects of the empirical gas laws.
Hilton, Don B. J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, 496.
Gases |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Chemometrics
Graham's law: Defining gas velocities  Kenney, Tom
Three alternatives for defining gas velocities.
Kenney, Tom J. Chem. Educ. 1990, 67, 871.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
The BedBugs game: A molecular motion simulator  Hogue, Lynn; Williams, John P.
Using the electronic game BedBugs to simulate molecular motion and illustrate diffusion, effusion, and Graham's law.
Hogue, Lynn; Williams, John P. J. Chem. Educ. 1990, 67, 585.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Transport Properties
Interactive program system for integration of reaction rate equations  Chesick, Jobn P.
93. The authors describe here a Pascal-language kinetics rate law integration package for the desktop microcomputer.
Chesick, Jobn P. J. Chem. Educ. 1988, 65, 599.
Rate Law |
Laboratory Computing / Interfacing |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Which will evaporate first?  Stenmark, Allan
The evaporation rate of various short-chain alcohols and diethyl ether are compared.
Stenmark, Allan J. Chem. Educ. 1987, 64, 351.
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Alcohols |
Ethers
TRS-80 Chemistry Lab, Volume 1, Review II (Hallgren, Richard C.)  Beck, James D.
Programs covering the kinetic theory, Charles' law, Boyle' law, titration, and solubility.
Beck, James D. J. Chem. Educ. 1985, 62, A106.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases |
Titration / Volumetric Analysis |
Precipitation / Solubility
TRS-80 Chemistry Lab, Volume 1, Review I (Hallgren, Richard C.)  Rowe, Frederick J.
Programs covering the kinetic theory, Charles' law, Boyle' law, titration, and solubility.
Rowe, Frederick J. J. Chem. Educ. 1985, 62, A105.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases |
Titration / Volumetric Analysis |
Precipitation / Solubility
Why do we teach gas laws?  Roe, Robert, Jr.
Justification for teaching the gas laws.
Roe, Robert, Jr. J. Chem. Educ. 1985, 62, 505.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
A gas kinetic explanation of simple thermodynamic processes  Waite, Boyd A.
Proposes a simplified, semi-quantitative description of heat, work, and internal energy from the viewpoint of gas kinetic theory; both heat and work should not be considered as forms of energy but rather as different mechanisms by which internal energy is transferred from system to surroundings.
Waite, Boyd A. J. Chem. Educ. 1985, 62, 224.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Thermodynamics
Further reflections on heat  Hornack, Frederick M.
Confusion regarding the nature of heat and thermodynamics.
Hornack, Frederick M. J. Chem. Educ. 1984, 61, 869.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Thermodynamics |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
Diffusion of gases - Kinetic molecular theory of gases  Schlecht, K. D.
Changing the pressure inside a container with a porous surface through the diffusion of hydrogen or helium.
Schlecht, K. D. J. Chem. Educ. 1984, 61, 251.
Gases |
Transport Properties |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Cinema, flirts, snakes, and gases  Hartwig, Dcio R.; Filho, Romeu C. Rocha
Explaining the kinetic behavior of gases through several analogies.
Hartwig, Dcio R.; Filho, Romeu C. Rocha J. Chem. Educ. 1982, 59, 295.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases
The molecular theory of matter  Davenport, Captain Richard P.
16 mm film.
Davenport, Captain Richard P. J. Chem. Educ. 1982, 59, 166.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
An experiment oriented approach to teaching the kinetic molecular theory  Wiseman, Frank L., Jr.
A series of experiments designed to illustrate the kinetic molecular theory and the differences between solids, liquids, and gases.
Wiseman, Frank L., Jr. J. Chem. Educ. 1979, 56, 233.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases |
Solids |
Liquids |
Nonmajor Courses
Participatory lecture demonstrations  Battino, Rubin
Examples of participatory lecture demonstrations in chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, the kinetic-molecular theory, Henry's law, electronic energy levels in atoms, translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of molecules, and organic chemistry.
Battino, Rubin J. Chem. Educ. 1979, 56, 39.
Chromatography |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Kinetics |
Stoichiometry |
Gases |
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Molecular Properties / Structure
The reactions of ferroin complexes. A color-to-colorless freshman kinetic experiment  Edwards, John O.; Edwards, Kathleen; Palma, Jorge
A group of related reactions that can be easily followed with a colorimeter which show that the mechanism by which a reaction takes place may not be at all obvious from the stoichiometry.
Edwards, John O.; Edwards, Kathleen; Palma, Jorge J. Chem. Educ. 1975, 52, 408.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Coordination Compounds |
Crystal Field / Ligand Field Theory |
Stoichiometry |
Mechanisms of Reactions
Fundamental theory of gases liquids, and solids by computer simulation. Use in the introductory course  Empedocles, Philip
The computer simulation of atomic motions presented here allows students to form a better foundation of their chemistry understanding.
Empedocles, Philip J. Chem. Educ. 1974, 51, 593.
Laboratory Computing / Interfacing |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
The definition of the rate of a chemical reaction  Canagaratna, S. G.
Most texts take it as obvious that the rate of a reaction may be defined in terms of changes in concentration; this definition is valid only if the reaction takes place without change of volume.
Canagaratna, S. G. J. Chem. Educ. 1973, 50, 200.
Rate Law |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Demonstrating Avogadro's hypothesis with the molecular dynamics simulator  Young, Jay A.; Plumb, Robert C.
The Molecular Dynamics Simulator simulate closely the behaviors predicted by the mathematical descriptions of the kinetic molecular theory.
Young, Jay A.; Plumb, Robert C. J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, 709.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Freezing curves for Salol  Laswick, Patty Hall
The convenient freezing temperature of salol (40-43 C) means that students can easily and safely melt the material using warm water
Laswick, Patty Hall J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, 537.
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Thermodynamics |
Nonmajor Courses |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Sea-lab experiment  Plumb, Robert C.
Illustrating the principles of the kinetic theory of gases.
Plumb, Robert C. J. Chem. Educ. 1970, 47, 175.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Chemical principles exemplified  Plumb, Robert C.
Introduction to a new series, containing "exempla" (brief anecdotes about materials and phenomena which exemplify chemical principles). [Debut]
Plumb, Robert C. J. Chem. Educ. 1970, 47, 175.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Thermodynamics |
Equilibrium |
Photochemistry |
Applications of Chemistry
Teaching kinetic molecular theory by the factor change method  Koons, Lawrence F.
Develops the "factor change method" for teaching kinetic molecular theory and presents examples of its application.
Koons, Lawrence F. J. Chem. Educ. 1967, 44, 288.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases
Hard sphere simulation of statistical mechanical behavior of molecules  Plumb, Robert C.
Describes the design and use of a demonstration device to illustrate the kinetic behavior of gases, liquids, and solids.
Plumb, Robert C. J. Chem. Educ. 1966, 43, 648.
Statistical Mechanics |
Gases |
Liquids |
Solids |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Equilibrium |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
Kinetic energies of gas molecules  Aherne, John C.
The graph representing the distribution of kinetic energy among the molecules of a gas found in many textbooks is incorrect.
Aherne, John C. J. Chem. Educ. 1965, 42, 655.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases
The original observations of Brownian motion  Layton, David
Clarifies the observations made by Robert Brown regarding what later came to be known as Brownian motion.
Layton, David J. Chem. Educ. 1965, 42, 367.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
An introduction to molecular kinetic theory (Hildebrand, Joel H.)  Eblin, Lawrence P.

Eblin, Lawrence P. J. Chem. Educ. 1964, 41, 171.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
A classical electrostatic view of chemical forces  Jaffe, H. H.
This paper reviews the different types of forces involved in the formation of chemical compounds, solids and liquids.
Jaffe, H. H. J. Chem. Educ. 1963, 40, 649.
Covalent Bonding |
Ionic Bonding |
Metallic Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Some aspects of chemical kinetics for elementary chemistry  Benson, Sidney W.
The author suggests greater efforts to address the issue of kinetics and reaction mechanisms in introductory chemistry.
Benson, Sidney W. J. Chem. Educ. 1962, 39, 321.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Gases |
Kinetics |
Mechanisms of Reactions |
Descriptive Chemistry
Kinetic molecular theory from a jukebox  Easley, W. K.; Powers, Glenn F.
Uses dancers to various styles of music as an analogy for differences between the atomic and molecular motions in solids, liquids, and gases.
Easley, W. K.; Powers, Glenn F. J. Chem. Educ. 1960, 37, 302.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Solids |
Liquids |
Gases
Dimensional analysis of chemical laws and theories  Benfey, O. Theodore
The dimensional analysis of the kinetic theory and organic structural theory.
Benfey, O. Theodore J. Chem. Educ. 1957, 34, 286.
Chemometrics |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory
Textbook errors: II. Brownian motion and the stability of colloids  Mysels, Karol J.
The fact that colloidal solutions are frequently quite stable and their particles do not sediment when kept in bottles under normal laboratory conditions is frequently attributed the incessant agitation of Brownian motion.
Mysels, Karol J. J. Chem. Educ. 1955, 32, 319.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Colloids
The kinetic structure of gases  Slabaugh, W. H.
Describes a model that illustrates the kinetic properties of gases and ii use to demonstrate the effect of temperature changes on the motion of gas particles.
Slabaugh, W. H. J. Chem. Educ. 1953, 30, 68.
Gases |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
The overhead projector and chemical demonstrations  Slabaugh, W. H.
Chemical demonstrations described for use with an overhead projector include the relative activity of metals, the electrolysis of water, the random motion of gas molecules, the action of metal couples, the relative strength of acids, the qualitative aspects of optical activity, and electrochemistry.
Slabaugh, W. H. J. Chem. Educ. 1951, 28, 579.
Metals |
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Acids / Bases |
Electrochemistry |
Aqueous Solution Chemistry