TIGER

Journal Articles: 14 results
Gas Permeability of Polymers  Bruno Lunelli
The recent article, Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts To Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon, proposes a model of permeation untenable and in contradiction with correct statements present in the same text and consequently does not consider the material of which the investigated balloons are made.
Lunelli, Bruno. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 1471.
Gases |
Transport Properties
Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts To Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon  Jee-Yon Lee, Hee-Soo Yoo, Jong Sook Park, Kwang-Jin Hwang, and Jin Seog Kim
In developing this laboratory, our initial motivation for the analysis of gases in a balloon was to answer simple and basic questions, such as, Why does a helium-charged balloon left in the air always drop in a few days? Is leakage of helium the only cause of the drop? What is the composition of the gas in the balloon when it falls after deflation? Students were intrigued by these questions, too, as they analyzed the variation over time in the composition in a balloon inflated with helium. Using the concepts of partial pressure and chemical potential, the laboratory experiment described effectively investigates the diffusion process and the behavior of gas molecules for teaching these concepts in general and physical chemistry.
Lee, Jee-Yon; Yoo, Hee-Soo; Park, Jong Sook; Hwang, Kwang-Jin; Kim, Jin Seog. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 288.
Transport Properties |
Gases |
Mass Spectrometry |
Quantitative Analysis
A Demonstration of Ideal Gas Principles Using a Football  William D. Bare and Lester Andrews
A class demonstration and cooperative learning activity in which the ideal gas law is applied to determine the volume of a football is described. The mass of an air-filled football is recorded at two or more pressures, and students are asked to use these data to solve problems involving the volume, pressure, and mass of the football and the molecular weight of the gas in the ball.
Bare, William D.; Andrews, Lester. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 622.
Gases |
Applications of Chemistry
Using History To Teach Scientific Method: The Case of Argon  Carmen J. Giunta
The history of science is full of stories that exhibit scientific methodology to an exemplary degree. Such stories can be vehicles for the teaching of scientific thought to non-science majors in general-education science courses, particularly if they do not involve much technical background and are told in ordinary language. This paper illustrates the kind of lessons that can be gleaned from such stories by examining the discovery of argon, an episode replete with examples of how scientists pursue knowledge.
Giunta, Carmen J. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1322.
Nonmajor Courses
Ernest Rutherford, Avogadro's Number, and Chemical Kinetics  I. A. Leenson
The paper presents a way for students to use data from Rutherford's works (1908 - 1911) in order to determine one of the most precise values of Avogadro Constant available at the beginning of the century.
Leenson, I. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 998.
Learning Theories |
Nuclear / Radiochemistry |
Kinetics
Why Does Helium Have 92% of the Lifting Power of Hydrogen if It Has Twice the Density?  David W. Ball
The answer to the question "Why Does Helium Have 92% of the Lifting Power of Hydrogen if It Has Twice the Density?" is discussed.
Ball, David W. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 726.
Gases |
Physical Properties
The Helium-Neon Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectrum of Molecular Iodine: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment  John S. Muenter
The wavelength analyzed fluorescence spectrum provides accurate values of spectroscopic properties for the ground state electronic configuration of I2. From these spectroscopic properties students calculate the bond length, harmonic oscillator force constant, and a Birge-Sponer estimate of the bond dissociation energy.
Muenter, John S. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 576.
Fluorescence Spectroscopy |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Lasers
Argon-potassium atomic weight inversion in the periodic table.  Arnikar, H. J.
An explanation for the Ar-K inversion in terms of the nuclear characteristics of the naturally occurring isotopes of these elements.
Arnikar, H. J. J. Chem. Educ. 1992, 69, 687.
Periodicity / Periodic Table |
Nuclear / Radiochemistry |
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Geochemistry |
Isotopes
How much radon is too much  Atwood, Charles H.
This paper is aimed at providing teachers with the most recent data on radon so that they can communicate that information to their students and to the general public.
Atwood, Charles H. J. Chem. Educ. 1992, 69, 351.
A two-dimensional working model of the neon electron configuration  Bricker, Clark E.
A demonstration that shows a dynamic, two-dimensional working model of the arrangement of the 10 electrons found in the neon core.
Bricker, Clark E. J. Chem. Educ. 1987, 64, 133.
Atomic Properties / Structure
Questions [and] Answers  Campbell, J. A.
Seven questions requiring an application of basic principles of chemistry.
Campbell, J. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, 831.
Enrichment / Review Materials |
Applications of Chemistry |
Gases |
Dyes / Pigments |
Metals
Letter to the editor (the author replies)  Holloway, John L.
Warns readers about the dangers associated with the preparation of xenon fluoride.
Holloway, John L. J. Chem. Educ. 1966, 43, 619.
Photochemistry
Letter to the editor  Chernick, Cedrick L.
Warns readers about the dangers associated with the preparation of xenon fluoride.
Chernick, Cedrick L. J. Chem. Educ. 1966, 43, 619.
Photochemistry
Would Mendeleev have predicted the existence of XeF4?  Ward, Roland
The author suggests that a contemporary Mendeleev might have used the concept of molecular orbitals to predict the existence of XeF4.
Ward, Roland J. Chem. Educ. 1963, 40, 277.
Nonmetals |
Molecular Properties / Structure