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For the textbook, chapter, and section you specified we found
22 Videos
4 Assessment Questions
2 Molecular Structures
97 Journal Articles
67 Other Resources
Videos: First 3 results
Safety Match Chemistry: Red Phosphorus and Potassium Chlorate  
The chemical reaction that underlies common safety matches is demonstrated.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
Chemiluminescence  
Luminol and light sticks are demonstrated.
Thermodynamics |
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
Polymers  
Formation of formaldehyde copolymers, nylon rope, high and low density polyethylene, combustion of polyethylene and polystyrene, Beilstein test, formation of solid latex, cleaning oil spills, slime, solid foams, super absorbent polymer, formation of polyurethane foam under normal and micro gravity, and construction of a rod climbing apparatus are demonstrated.
Polymerization |
Reactions |
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
View all 22 results
Assessment Questions: First 3 results
Special_Topics : GeneralFuel (6 Variations)
Which of the following statements is not accurate?
Applications of Chemistry
Special_Topics : OctaneRating (10 Variations)
Which of the following compounds is least helpful in preventing engine knocking in an automobile?
Applications of Chemistry
Special_Topics : PlasticRecycling (20 Variations)
Which of the following statements is not one of the reasons usually given in support of recycling plastics?
Polymerization |
Applications of Chemistry
View all 4 results
Molecular Structures: 2 results
Boric Acid B(OH)3

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Metalloids / Semimetals |
Consumer Chemistry

Chlorine Cl2

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Gases |
Consumer Chemistry |
Nonmetals |
Periodicity / Periodic Table

Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Impact of Polymers in Impact Sports  Sandy Van Natta and John P. Williams
This article describes some aspects of the design and testing of helmets and two inquiry-based activities for evaluating different polymers used in helmet construction.
Van Natta, Sandy; Williams, John P. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1326.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
Physical Properties
Modern Sport and Chemistry: What a Golf Fanatic Should Know  Scott E. McKay, Timothy Robbins, and Renée S. Cole
This paper focuses on golf and examines some of the structures and properties of materials that have led to significant changes in the skills required to excel at the highest levels of the game.
McKay, Scott E.; Robbins, Timothy; Cole, Renée S. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1319.
Consumer Chemistry |
Applications of Chemistry |
Materials Science
Scientific–Chemical Viewpoints Regarding Smoking: A Science Laboratory for All  Ron Blonder
This article describes a lab that examines the acidity of cigarette smoke as well as solid particles and vapor phase substances found therein, and simulates the effects of smoking on the lungs. The aim of this activity is to expose adolescents to the scientific aspects of smoking and the relevance of chemistry in everyday life.
Blonder, Ron. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 248.
Acids / Bases |
Consumer Chemistry |
Gases |
Laboratory Equipment / Apparatus |
pH |
Applications of Chemistry |
Student-Centered Learning
View all 97 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Characteristics of Materials  American Chemical Society
What makes diapers absorbent? Is peanut butter stickier than syrup or jelly? Strong, stretchy, sticky, or sweet—everything around us has special properties which make them unique. See if you can identify and compare the characteristics of materials.
Industrial Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Reactions |
Consumer Chemistry |
Gases |
Carbohydrates |
Proteins / Peptides |
Crystals / Crystallography |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Plant Chemistry |
Dyes / Pigments |
Lipids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Applications of Chemistry |
Nutrition |
Acids / Bases |
Chromatography |
Magnetic Properties |
Metals |
Polymerization |
Solutions / Solvents |
Descriptive Chemistry |
Food Science
Sunscreens  William F. Coleman
Reinforcing the "Heath and Wellness" theme of National Chemistry Week 2004, the featured molecules for this month are all found in commercial sunscreens, or in the synthesis of sunscreen materials. The paper by Stabile and Dicks introduces students of organic chemistry to the synthesis of cinnamate esters used in sunscreen products. Several of the papers referenced by those authors, most notably a paper by Doris Kimbrough (J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 51?53), present the structures of additional sunscreen components. Although the details of the synthesis are beyond the scope of most introductory courses, these molecules present an excellent opportunity for introducing students to the absorption of radiation that is far more relevant to their lives than the line spectra of hydrogen and other atoms. Such a discussion could be extended to include more delocalized dyes such as those frequently studied in physical chemistry courses as a test of particle-in-a-box models, and students could be asked about those molecules as sunscreens, which raises an interesting intersection between aesthetics and spectroscopy.
Consumer Chemistry
Molecular Models of Candy Components  William F. Coleman
This month's Featured Molecules come from the paper "A Spoonful of C12H22O11 Makes the Chemistry Go Down: Candy Motivations in the High School Chemistry Classroom" by Fanny K Ennever on using candy to illustrate various principles. They include sucrose and the invert sugar that results from the hydrolysis of sucrose. Students should look for structural similarities between sucrose and the hydrolysis products glucose and fructose, and verify that all three are indeed hydrates of carbon. They should also inspect the models to see whether the position of the substituents in the five and six membered rings are the same in the sucrose and in the hydrolysis products. Also included are two esters important in fruit flavoring of candies. Flavor and aroma are inexorably intertwined in the taste experience and no single compound is responsible for that experience. Methyl cinnamate, included here, is one of over 100 esters, and over 300 compounds, involved in the taste of strawberries (1). Isoamyl acetate is a major component of the taste of bananas. Lastly, chocolate, perhaps nothing else need be said. There is a great deal of confusion in the popular press and on the internet between theobromine, found in cocoa beans, and caffeine. Both molecules are included here and students should easily see why the two might be confused. Consequently there are many exaggerated claims about caffeine in chocolate. An interesting assignment would be for teams of students to find reliable data on the physiological effects of these similar molecules, and to find good analyses on the actual level of caffeine in cocoa beans, versus the amount added in the candy production process, if any.
Consumer Chemistry |
Molecular Modeling
View all 67 results