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For the textbook, chapter, and section you specified we found
4 Videos
2 Molecular Structures
19 Journal Articles
25 Other Resources
Videos: First 3 results
Safety Match Chemistry: Red Phosphorus and Potassium Chlorate  
The chemical reaction that underlies common safety matches is demonstrated.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
Chemiluminescence  
Luminol and light sticks are demonstrated.
Thermodynamics |
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
Polymers  
Formation of formaldehyde copolymers, nylon rope, high and low density polyethylene, combustion of polyethylene and polystyrene, Beilstein test, formation of solid latex, cleaning oil spills, slime, solid foams, super absorbent polymer, formation of polyurethane foam under normal and micro gravity, and construction of a rod climbing apparatus are demonstrated.
Polymerization |
Reactions |
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
View all 4 results
Molecular Structures: 2 results
Boric Acid B(OH)3

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Metalloids / Semimetals |
Consumer Chemistry

Chlorine Cl2

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Gases |
Consumer Chemistry |
Nonmetals |
Periodicity / Periodic Table

Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Experimental Determination of Ultraviolet Radiation Protection of Common Materials  Susana C. A. Tavares, Joaquim C. G. Esteves de Silva, and João Paiva
The oxidation of iodide is used as an indicator for the degree of exposure to UV radiation and to investigate the protection given by a simulation of ozone using plexiglass plates, sunscreen lotions, cotton cloth with different colors, and aqueous solutions with different concentrations of natural organic matter.
Tavares, Susana C. A.; Esteves de Silva, Joaquim C. G.; Paiva, João. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 1963.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy
Naturally Dangerous: Surprising Facts about Food, Health, and the Environment (by James P. Collman)   Harold H. Harris
Chemist's perspective on the topics of food, vitamins and minerals, herbal remedies, cancer and the environment, global warming, acid rain, ozone, and radiation.
Harris, Harold H. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 35.
Nonmajor Courses |
Consumer Chemistry |
Food Science |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Nuclear / Radiochemistry |
Vitamins |
Applications of Chemistry
Putting UV-Sensitive Beads to the Test  Terre Trupp
Explores the temperature behavior of UV-sensitive beads and investigates the effectiveness of sunscreens.
Trupp, Terre. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 648A.
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Kinetics |
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
Photochemistry
View all 19 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
The Nature of Electromagnetic Radiation in Everyday Life  Robert Hetue
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Nuclear / Radiochemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
Sunscreens  William F. Coleman
Reinforcing the "Heath and Wellness" theme of National Chemistry Week 2004, the featured molecules for this month are all found in commercial sunscreens, or in the synthesis of sunscreen materials. The paper by Stabile and Dicks introduces students of organic chemistry to the synthesis of cinnamate esters used in sunscreen products. Several of the papers referenced by those authors, most notably a paper by Doris Kimbrough (J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 51?53), present the structures of additional sunscreen components. Although the details of the synthesis are beyond the scope of most introductory courses, these molecules present an excellent opportunity for introducing students to the absorption of radiation that is far more relevant to their lives than the line spectra of hydrogen and other atoms. Such a discussion could be extended to include more delocalized dyes such as those frequently studied in physical chemistry courses as a test of particle-in-a-box models, and students could be asked about those molecules as sunscreens, which raises an interesting intersection between aesthetics and spectroscopy.
Consumer Chemistry
Molecular Models of Candy Components  William F. Coleman
This month's Featured Molecules come from the paper "A Spoonful of C12H22O11 Makes the Chemistry Go Down: Candy Motivations in the High School Chemistry Classroom" by Fanny K Ennever on using candy to illustrate various principles. They include sucrose and the invert sugar that results from the hydrolysis of sucrose. Students should look for structural similarities between sucrose and the hydrolysis products glucose and fructose, and verify that all three are indeed hydrates of carbon. They should also inspect the models to see whether the position of the substituents in the five and six membered rings are the same in the sucrose and in the hydrolysis products. Also included are two esters important in fruit flavoring of candies. Flavor and aroma are inexorably intertwined in the taste experience and no single compound is responsible for that experience. Methyl cinnamate, included here, is one of over 100 esters, and over 300 compounds, involved in the taste of strawberries (1). Isoamyl acetate is a major component of the taste of bananas. Lastly, chocolate, perhaps nothing else need be said. There is a great deal of confusion in the popular press and on the internet between theobromine, found in cocoa beans, and caffeine. Both molecules are included here and students should easily see why the two might be confused. Consequently there are many exaggerated claims about caffeine in chocolate. An interesting assignment would be for teams of students to find reliable data on the physiological effects of these similar molecules, and to find good analyses on the actual level of caffeine in cocoa beans, versus the amount added in the candy production process, if any.
Consumer Chemistry |
Molecular Modeling
View all 25 results