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For the textbook, chapter, and section you specified we found
1 Videos
2 Molecular Structures
29 Journal Articles
9 Other Resources
Videos: 1 results
HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work  
This is "HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work", from a video tape published by the Journal of Chemical Education - Software as Special Issue 13
Applications of Chemistry |
Enzymes |
Proteins / Peptides |
Medicinal Chemistry
Molecular Structures: 2 results
D-amphetamine C9H13N

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Amines / Ammonium Compounds |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Aromatic Compounds |
Acids / Bases

diazepam C16H13ClN2O

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Heterocycles |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Amides |
Aromatic Compounds |
Acids / Bases

Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Real-World Topics: Medicinal Chemistry  Arrietta Clauss
Instructors often look for real-world topics that interest students when designing labs and preparing lectures. The chemistry associated with drugs is a fertile area, and the archives of the Journal can be a resource for interesting drug-related activities to enhance student learning.
Clauss, Arrietta. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1657.
Enrichment / Review Materials |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Medicinal Chemistry |
Applications of Chemistry
Receptor Surface Models in the Classroom: Introducing Molecular Modeling to Students in a 3-D World  Werner J. Geldenhuys, Michael Hayes, Cornelis J. Van der Schyf, David D. Allen, and Sarel F. Malan
Proposes a novel method for teaching drug interactions with a receptor, enzyme, or any other macromolecule or protein using plastic molecular models and aluminum foil.
Geldenhuys, Werner J.; Hayes, Michael; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J.; Allen, David D.; Malan, Sarel F. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 979.
Bioorganic Chemistry |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Laboratory Computing / Interfacing |
Medicinal Chemistry |
Molecular Modeling |
Enzymes
The Discovery and Development of Cisplatin  Rebecca A. Alderden, Matthew D. Hall, and Trevor W. Hambley
Cisplatin is currently one of the most widely used anticancer drugs in the world. The unlikely events surrounding the discovery of its anticancer activity, subsequent introduction into the clinic, and the continuing research into platinum compounds is the subject of this review.
Alderden, Rebecca A.; Hall, Matthew D.; Hambley, Trevor W. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 728.
Bioinorganic Chemistry |
Coordination Compounds |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Medicinal Chemistry |
Metallic Bonding |
Oxidation State |
Synthesis
View all 29 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Molecular Models of Real and Mock Illicit Drugs from a Forensic Chemistry Activity  William F. Coleman
The Featured Molecules for this month come from the paper by Shawn Hasan, Deborah Bromfield-Lee, Maria T. Oliver-Hoyo, and Jose A. Cintron-Maldonado (1). The authors describe a forensic chemistry exercise in which model compounds are used to simulate the behavior of various drugs in a series of chemical tests. Structures of a number of the chemicals used in the experiment, and several of the drugs they are serving as proxy for, have been added to the molecule collection. Other substances used in the experiment are already part of the collection, including caffeine and aspirin. One structure that may be both intriguing and confusing to students is that of chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Figure 1). A majority of students might well expect the ring portion of the molecule to show a planar structure. This is not what is found from calculations at the HF/6311++G(d,p) level in both the gas phase and in water. Instead, the three rings are in a V-like formation with a deformation of approximately 50 degrees from planarity. Tracking down the source of this non-planarity would be a useful computational exercise. Does it arise from the presence of the alkyl chain (steric effect), from the chloro group (electronic effect), or from electronic effects involving the elements of the heterocyclic ring? As a starting point to addressing these questions, students could be introduced to the use of model compounds in computation. One such compound would be the parent ring system phenothiazine (Figure 2). That molecule contains neither a chloro substituent nor an extended alkyl group. Is it also found to be non-planar? Is the deformation angle the same, larger, or smaller than in chlorpromazine? Does the addition of chloro group to phenothiazene change the angle significantly? What about the addition of an alkyl group? If the model compound is forced to be planar are all of the vibrational frequencies real (positive)? If not, what type of deformation is suggested by the imaginary (negative) vibration?
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Forensic Chemistry
Nitric Oxide-Releasing Compounds  William F. Coleman, Randall J. Wildman
The five WebWare Molecules for December derive from the article Nitrogen-Based Diazeniumdiolates: Versatile Nitric Oxide-Releasing Compounds for Biomedical Research and Potential Clinical Applications by Joseph E. Saavedra and Larry K. Keefer.
Medicinal Chemistry
Prophine and Protoporphyrin  William F. Coleman, Randall J. Wildman
The WebWare molecules this month are from the article "Photochemotherapy: Light-Dependent Therapies in Medicine" by Edward P. Zovinka and Danielle R. Suneri. The first is a simple porphine, illustrating the ubiquitous four-nitrogen macrocycle, while the second is the protoporphyrin found in heme systems.
Medicinal Chemistry |
Photochemistry
View all 9 results