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9 Journal Articles
9 Other Resources
Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Water in the Atmosphere  Joel M. Kauffman
None of eight college-level general chemistry texts gave a mean value for water in the atmosphere, despite its being the third most prevalent constituent at about 1.5% by mass as vapor and about 2% if clouds and ice crystals are included. The importance of water as a greenhouse gas was omitted or marginalized by five of the eight texts. An infrared spectrum of humid air was determined to demonstrate that water vapor, because of its higher concentration, was more absorptive than carbon dioxide. The cooling effect of clouds, or other influences on the Earth's albedo, were not mentioned in most of the texts. These pervasive errors should be corrected in new or future editions of textbooks.
Kauffman, Joel M. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 1229.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases |
Green Chemistry |
IR Spectroscopy
Bringing State-of-the-Art, Applied, Novel, Green Chemistry to the Classroom by Employing the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards  Michael C. Cann
In our environmental chemistry course at the University of Scranton, students select one of the winning entries from the most recent PGCC Awards competition and present a poster on the entry. This exercise exposes these students to state-of-the-art, applied, novel, green chemistry that they would be unlikely to encounter in any other course.
Cann, Michael C. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1639.
Learning Theories |
Green Chemistry
Highlights: Ventures in freshman chemistry   Farrar, James M.; Eisenberg, Richard; Kampmeier, J. A.
A rigorous freshman chemistry course that prepares students for further study in chemistry and natural sciences ties principles of chemistry to energy and environment.
Farrar, James M.; Eisenberg, Richard; Kampmeier, J. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, 847.
Administrative Issues |
Green Chemistry |
Applications of Chemistry
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Other Resources: First 3 results
Molecular Models of Reactants and Products from an Asymmetric Synthesis of a Chiral Carboxylic Acid  William F. Coleman
Our JCE Featured Molecules for this month come from the paper by Thomas E. Smith, David P. Richardson, George A. Truran, Katherine Belecki, and Megumi Onishi (1). The authors describe the use of a chiral auxiliary, 4-benzyl-2-oxazolidinone, in the synthesis of a chiral carboxylic acid. The majority of the molecules used in the experiment, together with several of the pharmaceuticals mentioned in the paper, have been added to our molecule collection. In many instances multiple enantiomeric and diastereomeric forms of the molecules have been included. This experiment could easily be extended to incorporate various aspects of computation for use in an advanced organic or integrated laboratory. Here are some possible exercises using the R and S forms of the 4-benzyl-2-oxazolidinone as the authors point out that both forms are available commercially. Calculation of the optimized structures and energies of the enantiomers at the HF/631-G(d) level using Gaussian03 (2) produces the results shown in Table 1. Evaluation of the vibrational frequencies results in no imaginary frequencies and the 66 real frequencies are identical for the two forms. Examination of the computed IR spectra also shows them to be identical. Additionally, the Raman and NMR spectra can be calculated for the enantiomers and compared to experimental values and spectral patterns. A tool that is becoming increasingly important for assigning absolute configuration is vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). Although the vibrational spectra of an enantiomeric pair are identical, the VCD spectra show opposite signs, as shown in Figure 1. One can imagine a synthesis, using an unknown enantiomer of the chiral auxiliary, followed by calculations of the electronic and vibrational properties of all of the intermediates and the product, and determination of absolute configuration of reactants and products by comparison of experimental and computed VCD spectra. Using a viewer capable of displaying two molecules that can be moved independently, students could more easily visualize the origin of the enantiomeric preference in the reaction between the chelated enolate and allyl iodide.
Green Chemistry
Sorting recyclable plastics by density  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Physical Properties |
Green Chemistry
Synthesis of Biodiesel Fuel  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Stoichiometry |
Green Chemistry
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