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5 Videos
9 Assessment Questions
16 Molecular Structures
200 Journal Articles
16 Other Resources
Videos: First 3 results
Ozone: Absorbance of UV Light  
Ozone is produced. Exposure to a shortwave ultraviolet source causes the ozone to cast a shadow against a fluorescent yellow background.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Photochemistry
Atmospheric Pollution  
The formation and effects of acid rain and other pollutants are simulated.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
Atmosphere  
Topics associated with the atmosphere include atmospheric pressure, pollution and the role of ozone.
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry
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Assessment Questions: First 3 results
Radicals (9 Variations)
A collection of 9 assessment questions about Radicals
Addition Reactions |
Free Radicals |
Mechanisms of Reactions |
Reactions |
Aromatic Compounds
Special_Topics : AirPollutants (20 Variations)
Which of the following air pollutants can be described as a photochemically active free radical that contributes to acid rain and respiratory irritation?
Atmospheric Chemistry
Special_Topics : GeneralAcidRain (20 Variations)
Which of the following statements about acid rain is the most correct?
Atmospheric Chemistry
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Molecular Structures: First 3 results
Chlorine Monoxide ClO(r)

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Free Radicals |
VSEPR Theory |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Nonmetals

Nitrogen Dioxide NO2(r)

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Free Radicals |
VSEPR Theory |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Nonmetals

Nitric Oxide NO(r)

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Free Radicals |
Gases |
Biosignaling

View all 16 results
Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
More on ClO and Related Radicals  William B. Jensen
The novel Lewis structure for the ClO radical and other related 13e isoelectronic species presented by Hirsch and Kobrak is identical to that proposed by Linnett over 40 years ago for the same species on the basis of his well-known double-quartet approach to Lewis structures.
Jensen, William B. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 783.
Ionic Bonding |
Lewis Structures |
Free Radicals
Prussian Blue: Artists' Pigment and Chemists' Sponge  Mike Ware
The variable composition of Prussian blue tantalized chemists until investigations by X-ray crystallography in the late 20th century explained its many properties and uses.
Ware, Mike. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 612.
Applications of Chemistry |
Coordination Compounds |
Dyes / Pigments |
Electrochemistry |
Oxidation / Reduction |
Photochemistry |
Toxicology
A Simplified Model To Predict the Effect of Increasing Atmospheric CO2 on Carbonate Chemistry in the Ocean  Brian J. Bozlee, Maria Janebo, and Ginger Jahn
The chemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater is reviewed and used to predict the potential effect of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It is found that calcium carbonate may become unsaturated in cold surface seawater by the year 2100, resulting in the destruction of calcifying organisms such as coral.
Bozlee, Brian J.; Janebo, Maria; Jahn, Ginger. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 213.
Applications of Chemistry |
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Equilibrium |
Green Chemistry |
Water / Water Chemistry
View all 200 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Molecular Models of Antioxidants and Radicals  William F. Coleman
This month's featured molecules come from the paper by John M. Berger, Roshniben J. Rana, Hira Javeed, Iqra Javeed, and Sandi L. Schulien (1) describing the use of DPPH to measure antioxidant activity. DPPH was one of the featured molecules in September 2007 (2) and the basics of antioxidant activity were introduced in last month's column (3). In addition, some of the other molecules in the paper are already in the featured molecules collection (4). The remaining structures in the Figure 1 and Table 1 of the paper have been added to the collection. All structures have been optimized at the 6-311G(D,P) level. These molecules suggest a number of possible student activities, some reminiscent of previous columns and some new. (R,R,R)-α-tocopherol is one of the molecules in the mixture that goes by the name vitamin E. These molecules differ in the substituents on the benzene ring and on whether or not there are alternating double bonds in the phytyl tail. In (R,R,R)-α-tocopherol the R's refer to the three chiral carbon atoms in tail while α refers to the substituents on the ring. (R,R,R)-α-Tocopherol is the form found in nature. An interesting literature problem would be to have students learn more about the vitamin E mixture and the differing antioxidant activity of the various constituents. Additionally they could be asked to explore the difference between the word natural as used by a chemist, and "natural" as used on vitamin E supplements. Can students find regulations governing the use of the term "natural"? Can they suggest alternative legislation, and defend their ideas? If students read about vitamin C they will discover that only L-ascorbic acid is useful in the body. It would be interesting to extend the experiment described in the Berger et al. paper (1) to include D-ascorbic acid. How do the antioxidant abilities of the enantiomers, as determined by reaction with DPPH compare? Is this consistent with the behavior in the body? Why or why not? Berger et al. mention two other stable neutral radicals, TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and Fremy's salt. In a reversal from the use of stable radicals to measure antioxidant properties, these two molecules have proven to be very versatile oxidation catalysts in organic synthesis, and would make a rich source of research papers for students in undergraduate organic courses.
Free Radicals |
Natural Products
Biologically Active Exceptions to the Octet Rule  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Lewis Structures |
Free Radicals |
Vitamins
Exceptions to the Octet Rule  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Lewis Structures |
Free Radicals |
Molecular Properties / Structure
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