TIGER

Journal Articles: 49 results
A New "Bottom-Up" Framework for Teaching Chemical Bonding  Tami Levy Nahum, Rachel Mamlok-Naaman, Avi Hofstein, and Leeor Kronik
This article presents a general framework for bonding that can be presented at different levels of sophistication depending on the student's level and needs. The pedagogical strategy for teaching this model is a "bottom-up" one, starting with basic principles and ending with specific properties.
Levy Nahum, Tami; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Kronik, Leeor. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1680.
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Covalent Bonding |
Ionic Bonding |
Lewis Structures |
Materials Science |
MO Theory |
Noncovalent Interactions
Stilling Waves with Ordered Molecular Monolayers  Ed Vitz
The amazing ability of a film of oil one molecule thick to dissipate the relatively large energy of water waves can be readily demonstrated, but an explanation of the effect has been elusive until recently.
Vitz, Ed. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1064.
Lipids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Surface Science |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Fatty Acids
A Lab Experience To Illustrate the Physicochemical Principles of Detergency  J. A. Poce-Fatou, M. Bethencourt-Núñez, C. Moreno, F. J. Moreno-Dorado, and J. J. Pinto-Ganfornina
This article presents a lab to study the role of a surfactant and builder in laundry detergent efficiency as determined through measurements of the diffuse reflectances of polyester samples impregnated with linseed oil.
Poce-Fatou, J. A.; Bethencourt-Núñez, M.; Moreno, C.; Moreno-Dorado, F. J.; Pinto-Ganfornina, J. J. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 266.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
Laboratory Equipment / Apparatus |
Micelles |
Surface Science |
Thermodynamics
Colorful Lather Printing  Susan A. S. Hershberger, Matt Nance, Arlyne M. Sarquis, and Lynn M. Hogue
Students explore the chemistry of polar and nonpolar substances and surfactants while marbling paper with shaving cream and food coloring.
Hershberger, Susan A. S.; Nance, Matt; Sarquis, Arlyne M.; Hogue, Lynn M. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 608A.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Physical Properties |
Surface Science |
Water / Water Chemistry
Dancing Crystals: A Dramatic Illustration of Intermolecular Forces  Donald W. Mundell
Crystals of naphthalene form on the surface of an acetone solution and dance about in an animated fashion illustrating surface tension, crystallization, and intermolecular forces. Additional experiments reveal the properties of the solution and previous demonstrations of surface motion are explored.
Mundell, Donald W. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 1773.
Aromatic Compounds |
Liquids |
Molecular Mechanics / Dynamics |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Physical Properties |
Surface Science |
Noncovalent Interactions
Preparation of CdS Nanoparticles by First-Year Undergraduates  Kurt Winkelmann, Thomas Noviello, and Steven Brooks
First-year undergraduate students prepare bulk and nanometer-sized cadmium sulfide clusters within water-in-oil micelles and calculate particle size using the effective mass model.
Winkelmann, Kurt; Noviello, Thomas; Brooks, Steven. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 709.
Colloids |
Materials Science |
Nanotechnology |
Micelles |
Semiconductors |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy
Molecular Handshake: Recognition through Weak Noncovalent Interactions  Parvathi S. Murthy
This article traces the development of our thinking about molecular recognition through noncovalent interactions, highlights their salient features, and suggests ways for comprehensive education on this important concept.
Murthy, Parvathi S. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 1010.
Applications of Chemistry |
Biosignaling |
Membranes |
Molecular Recognition |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Chromatography |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Polymerization |
Reactions
Intermolecular and Intramolecular Forces: A General Chemistry Laboratory Comparison of Hydrogen Bonding in Maleic and Fumaric Acids  Frazier W. Nyasulu and John Macklin
This article presents a simple laboratory experiment that is designed to enhance students' understanding of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding by demonstrating the comparative effect of these phenomena on some chemical and physical properties.
Nyasulu, Frazier W.; Macklin, John. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 770.
Acids / Bases |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Thermodynamics |
Titration / Volumetric Analysis
The Nature of Hydrogen Bonding  Emeric Schultz
Students use toy connecting blocks and Velcro to investigate weak intermolecular interactions, specifically hydrogen bonds.
Schultz, Emeric. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 400A.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Covalent Bonding |
Molecular Modeling |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Chemistry of Moth Repellents  Gabriel Pinto
A real-life example consisting of the study of the different substances used as moth repellents is presented to introduce students to miscellaneous topics such as sublimation, intermolecular forces, insecticides, and the effect of moths on clothes. A set of questions about the most common moth repellents, well known to students, is used to motivate them to understand several everday phenomena through chemistry concepts.
Pinto, Gabriel. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 1321.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Applications of Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Solids |
Physical Properties |
Consumer Chemistry
Simple Dynamic Models for Hydrogen Bonding Using Velcro-Polarized Molecular Models  Emeric Schultz
This article describes the use of models that dynamically illustrate the unique characteristics of weak intermolecular interactions, specifically hydrogen bonds. The models clearly demonstrate that H-bonds can break and reform while covalent bonds stay intact. The manner in which the models form and break H-bonds reflects the geometric and statistical manner in which H-bonding actually occurs and is not contrived. The use of these models addresses a significant area of student misconceptions. The construction of these molecular models is described.
Schultz, Emeric. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 401.
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Molecular Modeling |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams
A Supramolecular Approach to Medicinal Chemistry: Medicine Beyond the Molecule  David K. Smith
This article emphasizes a conceptual view of medicinal chemistry, which has important implications for the future, as the supramolecular approach to medicinal-chemistry products outlined here is rapidly allowing nanotechnology to converge with medicine. In particular, this article discusses recent developments including the rational design of drugs such as Relenza and Tamiflu, the mode of action of vancomycin, and the mechanism by which bacteria develop resistance, drug delivery using cyclodextrins, and the importance of supramolecular chemistry in understanding protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's and CreutzfieldJacob.
Smith, David K. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 393.
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Medicinal Chemistry |
Nanotechnology |
Proteins / Peptides
Intermolecular Forces as a Key to Understanding the Environmental Fate of Organic Xenobiotics  Ryan E. Casey and Faith A. Pittman
We have developed an environmental chemistry module that can be used in high schools or undergraduate nonscience courses to relate chemical structures and properties to the macroscopic behavior of environmentally relevant organic chemicals like pesticides, PCBs, and solvents. The module introduces the concepts of intermolecular forces, polarity, and partitioning to explain complex phenomena such as environmental transport and biomagnification of xenobiotics (human-made chemicals).
Casey, Ryan E.; Pittman, Faith A. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 260.
Nonmajor Courses |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Using Science Fiction To Teach Thermodynamics: Vonnegut, Ice-nine, and Global Warming  Charles A. Liberko
When covering the topic of thermodynamics at the introductory level, an example from Kurt Vonnegut, Jr's, fictional novel, Cat's Cradle, is used to take what the students have learned and apply it to a new situation.
Liberko, Charles A. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 509.
Thermodynamics |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
Three-Dimensional Model for Water: Magnets as Dipoles  Samuel H. Yalkowsky and Jennifer L. H. Johnson
Reply to comments on original article.
Yalkowsky, Samuel H.; Johnson, Jennifer L. H. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 34.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Lipids |
Liquids |
Molecular Modeling |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Solutions / Solvents |
Water / Water Chemistry
Three-Dimensional Model for Water: Magnets as Chemical Bonds  Roy W. Clark
Concerns over students confusing electrical and magnetic fields.
Clark, Roy W. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 34.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Lipids |
Liquids |
Molecular Modeling |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Solutions / Solvents |
Water / Water Chemistry
Purple or Colorless—Which Way Up? An Entertaining Solubility Demonstration  Trevor M. Kitson
Discrepant demonstration involving immiscible mixture of water colored with potassium permanganate and hexane.
Kitson, Trevor M. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 892.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Physical Properties
Micelle-Mediated Extraction of Heavy Metals from Environmental Samples: An Environmental Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  Dimosthenis L. Giokas, Evangelos K. Paleologos, and Miltiades I. Karayannis
A laboratory focussing on the determination of metallic elements in drinking water through cloud-point extraction.
Giokas, Dimosthenis L.; Paleologos, Evangelos K.; Karayannis, Miltiades I. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 61.
Atomic Spectroscopy |
Metals |
Micelles |
Separation Science |
Green Chemistry |
Qualitative Analysis |
Quantitative Analysis
A Structure–Activity Investigation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport. An Interdisciplinary Experiment for the First-Year Laboratory  Kerry K. Karukstis, Gerald R. Van Hecke, Katherine A. Roth, and Matthew A. Burden
Investigation in which students measure the effect of several inhibitors (herbicides) on the electron transfer rate in chloroplasts and formulate a hypothesis between the inhibitor's activity and its structure as a means of using a physical technique to measure a chemical process in a biological system.
Karukstis, Kerry K.; Van Hecke, Gerald R.; Roth, Katherine A.; Burden, Matthew A. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 985.
Biophysical Chemistry |
Electrochemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy |
Aromatic Compounds |
Plant Chemistry
An Introduction to the Scientific Process: Preparation of Poly(vinyl acetate) Glue  Robert G. Gilbert, Christopher M. Fellows, James McDonald, and Stuart W. Prescott
Exercise to give students experience in scientific processes while introducing them to synthetic polymer colloids.
Gilbert, Robert G.; Fellows, Christopher M.; McDonald, James; Prescott, Stuart W. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 1370.
Industrial Chemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Surface Science |
Polymerization |
Applications of Chemistry |
Colloids
Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble   JCE Editorial Staff
In this activity, students first create a standard solution by mixing water with liquid dishwashing detergent. They then add glycerin, rubbing alcohol, and one or more additional substances to samples of the detergent solution. The solutions are compared to see which produces the longest-lasting bubbles.
JCE Editorial Staff, . J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 40A.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Surface Science
Enchanted Glass  Sándor Szabó L., Károly Mazák, Dezsö Knausz, and Márta Rózsahegyi
These experiments present the "hydrophobizing" and organophilic properties of silicones. The method is to make hydrophobic the polar, hydrophilic surface of glass by silylating the surface of various glass objects with trimethylsilyl N,N-dimethylcarbamate; the process of activating and silylating glass beads, capillaries, beakers, and glass sheets is described.
Szabó L., Sándor; Mazák, Károly; Knausz, Dezsö; Rózsahegyi, Márta. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 329.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Organometallics |
Surface Science |
Descriptive Chemistry
A Simple Protein Purification and Folding Experiment for General Chemistry Laboratory  Robert Bowen, Richard Hartung, and Yvonne M. Gindt
A simple procedure for the crude purification of a chromoprotein suitable for a general chemistry laboratory. The protein, phycocyanin, is easy to purify and very stable. It contains a chromophore that can serve to report the integrity of the protein structure: the chromoprotein is dark blue when the protein is folded in its native conformation, and it turns a very pale blue when the protein is unfolded or denatured.
Bowen, Robert ; Hartung, Richard; Gindt, Yvonne M. J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 1456.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Photochemistry |
Proteins / Peptides |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy
The Solubility of Ionic Solids and Molecular Liquids  C. Baer and Sheila M. Adamus
The solubilities of three ionic salts (NaCl, PbCl2, and KAl(SO4)2.12H2O) in water are measured at four temperatures. The concept of recrystallization is introduced as students cool a high-temperature solution and observe crystal formation. Spreadsheet calculations are performed with the group data, which are then graphed, and students observe the wide variance in solubility behavior for the three salts.
Baer, Carl; Adamus, Sheila M. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1540.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Laboratory Computing / Interfacing |
Liquids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Solutions / Solvents
Ammonia Can Crush  Ed Vitz
When a 12-oz aluminum soft drink can filled with ammonia or hydrogen chloride gas is inverted and dipped into water, the rapidly dissolving gas evacuates the can and the can is crushed before water can be drawn into it. This demonstrates, among other things, the remarkable strength of hydrogen bonds.
Vitz, Ed. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 932.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Gases |
Solutions / Solvents |
Hydrogen Bonding
Solving the Mystery of Fading Fingerprints with London Dispersion Forces  Doris R. Kimbrough and Ronald DeLorenzo
The fingerprints of the perpetrator are often not the only ones of importance in the collection of evidence. The fingerprints of the victim can be extremely important as well, and obtaining them when the victim is a child can be a tricky and frustrating endeavor.
Kimbrough, Doris R.; DeLorenzo, Ronald. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1300.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Forensic Chemistry |
Esters |
Applications of Chemistry
Intermolecular Forces in Introductory Chemistry Studied by Gas Chromatography, Computer Models, and Viscometry  Jonathan C. Wedvik, Charity McManaman, Janet S. Anderson, and Mary K. Carroll
Students performing gas chromatographic (GC) analyses of mixtures of n-alkanes and samples that simulate crime scene evidence discover that liquid mixtures can be separated rapidly into their components based upon intermolecular forces. Each group of students is given a liquid sample that simulates one collected at an arson scene, and the group is required to determine the identity of the accelerant. Students also examine computer models to better visualize how molecular structure affects intermolecular forces: London forces, dipole-dipole interactions, and hydrogen bonding.
Wedvik, Jonathan C.; McManaman, Charity; Anderson, Janet S.; Carroll, Mary K. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 885.
Theoretical Chemistry |
Chromatography |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Gas Chromatography |
Molecular Modeling |
Forensic Chemistry |
Alkanes / Cycloalkanes |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Why Do Alcoholic Beverages Have "Legs"?  Todd P. Silverstein
After a sip of wine, "legs" of liquid typically run up and down the inside of the glass for many minutes. This phenomenon stems from the dipole-dipole intermolecular forces that are so important in understanding the physical behavior of aqueous solutions.
Silverstein, Todd P. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 723.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Learning Theories |
Alcohols |
Hydrogen Bonding
Portraying the Structure of Micelles  F. M. Menger, R. Zana, and B. Lindman
The schematic of a micelle is given as an attempt to "disprove" the appearance of the spokes of a wheel.
Menger, F. M.; Zana, R.; Lindman, B. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 115.
Micelles |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Molecular Modeling
A Simple Demonstration of How Intermolecular Forces Make DNA Helical  Michael F. Bruist
The usage of stacked identical boxes can be used to demonstrate the helical shape of DNA by the effect of intermolecular forces.
Bruist, Michael F. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 53.
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Molecular Modeling
Boiling Point and Molecular Weight  Rich, Ronald L.
No relationship between boiling points and molecular weight.
Rich, Ronald L. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, A294.
Physical Properties |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Letters  
No relationship between boiling points and molecular weight.
J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, A294.
Physical Properties |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Musk Oxen and Micelles  John W. Hill
Musk oxen behavior provides an analogy to micelle formation by amphipathic substances.
J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 847.
Micelles
Small Scale Electrophoresis  Brooks, Helen B.; Brooks, David W.
Simple electrophoresis apparatus for separating food coloring in plastic pipet using five 9-V batteries.
Brooks, Helen B.; Brooks, David W. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, A28.
Electrophoresis |
Laboratory Equipment / Apparatus |
Biotechnology |
Micelles |
Separation Science |
Microscale Lab
Can London Dispersion Forces Be Stronger than Dipole-Dipole Forces, Including Hydrogen Bonds?  Thomas T. Earles
Using French fries as an example in which London dispersion forces are stronger than dipole-dipole forces.
Earles, Thomas T. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 727.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding
Electrolytic migration of ions  Llorens-Molina, Juan A.
This demonstration uses a thin layer of gelatin in place of the usual filter paper so that the migration can be viewed using an overhead projector.
Llorens-Molina, Juan A. J. Chem. Educ. 1988, 65, 1090.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Ion Exchange |
Electrochemistry |
Thin Layer Chromatography
The Rayleigh fountain   Skinner, James F.; Moir, James F.
The demonstration presented in this note provides and excellent example of the difference between polar and nonpolar liquids.
Skinner, James F.; Moir, James F. J. Chem. Educ. 1988, 65, 69.
Noncovalent Interactions
When oil and water do not mix  Trammell, Gary L.
An introduction to the physics and chemistry of interfaces and lipids, and reactions in micelles.
Trammell, Gary L. J. Chem. Educ. 1987, 64, 1022.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents |
Micelles |
Lipids
Which will evaporate first?  Stenmark, Allan
The evaporation rate of various short-chain alcohols and diethyl ether are compared.
Stenmark, Allan J. Chem. Educ. 1987, 64, 351.
Physical Properties |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Alcohols |
Ethers
Methane pistol  Skinner, James F.
This simple demonstration leaves a lasting impression of the importance of intermolecular forces and hydrogen bonding.
Skinner, James F. J. Chem. Educ. 1987, 64, 171.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Molecular Properties / Structure
A model for hydrogen bonding  Hill, John W.
Hydrogen bonding is a somewhat abstract and difficult concept for many students, yet it is of enormous importance in chemistry.
Hill, John W. J. Chem. Educ. 1986, 63, 503.
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Coulombic models in chemical bonding. II. Dipole moments of binary hydrides  Sacks, Lawrence J.
A discussion of Coulumbic models and their aid in understanding chemical bonding.
Sacks, Lawrence J. J. Chem. Educ. 1986, 63, 373.
Electrochemistry |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Covalent Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Non-covalent interactions: Key to biological flexibility and specificity  Frieden, Earl
Summarizes the types of non-covalent interactions found among biomolecules and how they facilitate the function of antibodies, hormones, and hemoglobin.
Frieden, Earl J. Chem. Educ. 1975, 52, 754.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Proteins / Peptides |
Amino Acids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Hormones
Great affinity of ammonia for water  Chen, Philip S.
Demonstrates the great affinity of ammonia for water.
Chen, Philip S. J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, A267.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding
Using silica to demonstrate hydrogen bonding  Most, Clark, Jr.
The efficiency of a multitude of hydrogen bonds can be demonstrated by comparing the fluid character of mineral oil to the more solid character of the same oil to which has been added a small amount of finely divided silica.
Most, Clark, Jr. J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, 419.
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Investigation of interaction in the Pb(NO3)2NaClmethanolwater system  Neidig, H. A.
The purpose of this investigation is to collect solubility data for lead(II) nitratesodium chloride methanolwater systems from which a microscopic model can be constructed and used to discuss the various types of interactions occurring.
Neidig, H. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1965, 42, 475.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Precipitation / Solubility |
Noncovalent Interactions
Lone pair electrons  Fowles, Gerald W. A.
The lone pair electrons, whether in simple or hybrid orbitals, have profound effects on the properties of the molecule; these effects may be discussed as bond angles, dipole moments, bond energies and lengths, and coordination and hydrogen bonding.
Fowles, Gerald W. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1957, 34, 187.
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Covalent Bonding |
Coordination Compounds |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Some aspects of hydrogen bonding in inorganic chemistry  Gorman, Mel
The purpose of this review is to present some of the research which is illustrative of the methods used and the results obtained with a variety of inorganic compounds in which hydrogen bonding is one of the structural features.
Gorman, Mel J. Chem. Educ. 1956, 33, 468.
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions
Ammonia and "ammonium hydroxide"  Davis, John B.
One of several reactions that needs reevaluation in the light of the modern theory of valence is the reaction between ammonia and water and the fiction of the ammonium hydroxide molecule.
Davis, John B. J. Chem. Educ. 1953, 30, 511.
Amines / Ammonium Compounds |
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Reactions |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Noncovalent Interactions