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Journal Articles: 67 results
Using Graphs of Gibbs Energy versus Temperature in General Chemistry Discussions of Phase Changes and Colligative Properties  Robert M. Hanson, Patrick Riley, Jeff Schwinefus, and Paul J. Fischer
The use of qualitative graphs of Gibbs energy versus temperature is described in the context of chemical demonstrations involving phase changes and colligative properties at the general chemistry level.
Hanson, Robert M.; Riley, Patrick; Schwinefus, Jeff; Fischer, Paul J. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1142.
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Physical Properties |
Thermodynamics
Understanding the Clausius–Clapeyron Equation by Employing an Easily Adaptable Pressure Cooker  Monica Galleano, Alberto Boveris, and Susana Puntarulo
Describes a laboratory exercise to understand the effect of pressure on phase equilibrium as described by the ClausiusClapeyron equation. The equipment required is a pressure cooker adapted with a pressure gauge and a thermometer in the lid, allowing the measurement of the pressure and the temperature of the chamber containing the water heated until vaporization.
Galleano, Monica; Boveris, Alberto; Puntarulo, Susana. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 276.
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Thermodynamics |
Water / Water Chemistry
Configurational Entropy Revisited  Frank L. Lambert
Positional entropy should be eliminated from general chemistry instruction and replaced by emphasis on the motional energy of molecules as enabling entropy change.
Lambert, Frank L. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 1548.
Statistical Mechanics |
Thermodynamics
Mass-Elastic Band Thermodynamics: A Visual Teaching Aid at the Introductory Level  William C. Galley
Demonstrations of five spontaneous isothermal processes involving the coupling of a mass and elastic band and arising from combinations of enthalpy and entropy changes are presented and then dissected. Analogies are drawn between these processes and common spontaneous molecular events such as chemical reactions and phase transitions.
Galley, William C. J. Chem. Educ. 2007, 84, 1147.
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry |
Thermodynamics
No "Driving Forces" in General Chemistry  Evguenii I. Kozliak
A simple and easy-to-remember explanation, that precipitation of a solid and/or formation of water are driving forces of those reactions or drive them to completion, still occurs among instructors.
Kozliak, Evguenii I. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 702.
Bioenergetics |
Biophysical Chemistry |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry |
Thermodynamics
Sugar Dehydration without Sulfuric Acid  Edward F. Duhr, Allison S. Soult, John G. Maijub, and Fitzgerald B. Bramwell
The procedure for Sugar Dehydration without Sulfuric Acid: No More Choking Fumes in the Classroom! can lead to watch glass breakage and thereby a fire hazard.
Duhr, Edward F.; Soult, Allison S.; Maijub, John G.; Bramwell, Fitzgerald B. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 701.
Oxidation / Reduction |
Thermodynamics
Give Them Money: The Boltzmann Game, a Classroom or Laboratory Activity Modeling Entropy Changes and the Distribution of Energy in Chemical Systems  Robert M. Hanson and Bridget Michalek
Described here is a short, simple activity that can be used in any high school or college chemistry classroom or lab to explore the way energy is distributed in real chemical systems and as an entry into discussions of the probabilistic nature of entropy.
Hanson, Robert M.; Michalek, Bridget. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 581.
Equilibrium |
Statistical Mechanics |
Thermodynamics
Using Computer Simulations To Teach Salt Solubility. The Role of Entropy in Solubility Equilibrium  Victor M. S. Gil and João C. M. Paiva
Pairs of salts are discussed to illustrate the interpretation of their different behavior in water in terms of the fundamental concept of entropy. The ability of computer simulations to help improve students' understanding of these chemistry concepts is also examined.
Gil, Victor M. S.; Paiva, João C. M. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 170.
Computational Chemistry |
Equilibrium |
Thermodynamics |
Solutions / Solvents |
Precipitation / Solubility
E = mc2 for the Chemist: When Is Mass Conserved?  Richard S. Treptow
Einstein's famous equation is frequently misunderstood in textbooks and popular science literature. Its correct interpretation is that mass and energy are different measures of a single quantity known as massenergy, which is conserved in all processes.
Treptow, Richard S. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 1636.
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Nuclear / Radiochemistry |
Theoretical Chemistry |
Thermodynamics
Microscopic Description of Le Châtelier's Principle  Igor Novak
The analysis based on microscopic descriptors (energy levels and their populations) is given that provides visualization of free energies and conceptual rationalization of Le Châtelier's principle. The misconception "nature favors equilibrium" is highlighted.
Novak, Igor. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 1190.
Equilibrium |
Thermodynamics
Regarding Entropy Analysis  Thomas H. Bindel
There is a problem with the symbol ?Suniv as it does not indicate whether the reactive system is in standard state or not.
Bindel, Thomas H. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 839.
Thermodynamics
Regarding Entropy Analysis  Robert M. Hanson
Presents a minor criticism I have regards ?Suniv not involving entropy effects of concentration and pressure.
Hanson, Robert M. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 839.
Thermodynamics
Let's Drive "Driving Force" Out of Chemistry  Norman C. Craig
"Driving force" is identified as a misleading concept in analyzing spontaneous change. Driving force wrongly suggests that Newtonian mechanics and determinism control and explain spontaneous processes. The usefulness of the competition of ?H versus ?S in discussing chemical change is also questioned. Entropy analyseswhich consider the contributions to the total change in entropyare advocated.
Craig, Norman C. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 827.
Natural Products |
Bioenergetics |
Biophysical Chemistry |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry |
Thermodynamics
Teaching Entropy Analysis in the First-Year High School Course and Beyond  Thomas H. Bindel
A 16-day teaching unit is presented that develops chemical thermodynamics at the introductory high school level and beyond from exclusively an entropy viewpoint referred to as entropy analysis. Many concepts are presented, such as: entropy, spontaneity, the second law of thermodynamics, qualitative and quantitative entropy analysis, extent of reaction, thermodynamic equilibrium, coupled equilibria, and Gibbs free energy. Entropy is presented in a nontraditional way, using energy dispersal.
Bindel, Thomas H. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 1585.
Thermodynamics
Entropy and Constraint of Motion  Frank L. Lambert
William Jensen's presentation of entropy increase as solely due to kinetic energy dispersion is stimulating.
Lambert, Frank L. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 640.
Thermodynamics
Entropy and Constraint of Motion   William B. Jensen
I would like to make several observations supplementing and supporting the article by Frank Lambert on entropy as energy dissipation, since this is an approach that I have also used for many years when teaching a qualitative version of the entropy concept to students of general and introductory inorganic chemistry.
Jensen, William B. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 639.
Thermodynamics
Using Science Fiction To Teach Thermodynamics: Vonnegut, Ice-nine, and Global Warming  Charles A. Liberko
When covering the topic of thermodynamics at the introductory level, an example from Kurt Vonnegut, Jr's, fictional novel, Cat's Cradle, is used to take what the students have learned and apply it to a new situation.
Liberko, Charles A. J. Chem. Educ. 2004, 81, 509.
Thermodynamics |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
Playing-Card Equilibrium  Robert M. Hanson
A simple hands-on simulation suitable for either classroom use or laboratory investigation involves using a standard deck of playing cards to explore the statistical aspects of equilibrium. Concepts that can be easily demonstrated include fluctuation around a most probable distribution, Le Chtelier's principle, the equilibrium constant, prediction of the equilibrium constant based on probability, and the effect of sample size on equilibrium fluctuations.
Hanson, Robert M. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 1271.
Equilibrium |
Statistical Mechanics |
Thermodynamics
"Disorder" in Unstretched Rubber Bands?  Warren Hirsch
Analysis of the thermodynamics of a stretched rubber band.
Hirsch, Warren. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 145.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Thermodynamics
"Disorder" in Unstretched Rubber Bands?  Frank L. Lambert
Analysis of the thermodynamics of a stretched rubber band.
Lambert, Frank L. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 145.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Thermodynamics
"Disorder" in Unstretched Rubber Bands?  Frank L. Lambert
Analysis of the thermodynamics of a stretched rubber band.
Lambert, Frank L. J. Chem. Educ. 2003, 80, 145.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Thermodynamics
Rubber Bands, Free Energy, and Le Châtelier's Principle  Warren Hirsch
Using a rubber band to illustrate Gibbs free energy, entropy, and enthalpy.
Hirsch, Warren. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 200A.
Noncovalent Interactions |
Thermodynamics |
Equilibrium
Energy as Money, Chemical Bonding as Business, and Negative ΔH and ΔG as Investment   Evguenii I. Kozliak
Analogy for explaining the sign (+ or -) of ?H, ?G, and ?S to introductory students.
Kozliak, Evguenii I. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 1435.
Nonmajor Courses |
Thermodynamics
Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively  Frank L. Lambert
Explanation of entropy in terms of energy dispersal; includes considerations of fusion and vaporization, expanding gasses and mixing fluids, colligative properties, and the Gibbs function.
Lambert, Frank L. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 1241.
Thermodynamics |
Phases / Phase Transitions / Diagrams |
Gases
A Chemically Relevant Model for Teaching the Second Law of Thermodynamics  Bryce E. Williamson and Tetsuo Morikawa
Presentation of a chemically relevant model that exemplifies many aspects of the second law: reversibility, path dependence, and extrapolation in terms of electrochemistry and calorimetry.
Williamson, Bryce E.; Morikawa, Tetsuo. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 339.
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry |
Electrochemistry |
Thermodynamics
Disorder--A Cracked Crutch for Supporting Entropy Discussions  Frank L. Lambert
Arguments against using disorder as a means of introducing and teaching entropy.
Lambert, Frank L. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 187.
Thermodynamics
On the Importance of Ideality  Rubin Battino, Scott E. Wood, and Arthur G. Williamson
Analysis of the utility of ideality in gaseous phenomena, solutions, and the thermodynamic concept of reversibility.
Battino, Rubin; Wood, Scott E.; Williamson, Arthur G. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 1364.
Thermodynamics |
Gases |
Solutions / Solvents
The Isothermal Heat Conduction Calorimeter: A Versatile Instrument for Studying Processes in Physics, Chemistry, and Biology  Lars Wadsö, Allan L. Smith, Hamid Shirazi, S. Rose Mulligan, and Thomas Hofelich
A simple but sensitive isothermal heat-conduction calorimeter and five experiments for students to illustrate its use (heat capacity of solids, acid-base titration, enthalpy of vaporization of solvents, cement hydration, and insect metabolism).
Wadsö, Lars; Smith, Allan L.; Shirazi, Hamid; Mulligan, S. Rose; Hofelich, Thomas. J. Chem. Educ. 2001, 78, 1080.
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry |
Laboratory Equipment / Apparatus |
Thermal Analysis |
Thermodynamics
A Visual Aid in Enthalpy Calculations  Sebastian G. Canagaratna
This article discusses the use of enthalpy-temperature diagrams for reactants and products as a visual aid in the teaching of reaction-enthalpy calculations. By the use of such diagrams the division of the process into a part involving a chemical reaction without a temperature change and a part involving only a temperature change is made visually concrete.
Canagaratna, Sebastian G. J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 1178.
Thermodynamics |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
Understanding Electrochemical Thermodynamics through Entropy Analysis  Thomas H. Bindel
This discovery-based activity involves entropy analysis of galvanic cells. The intent of the activity is for students to discover the fundamentals of electrochemical cells through a combination of entropy analysis, exploration, and guided discovery.
Bindel, Thomas H. J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 1031.
Electrochemistry |
Thermodynamics |
Electrolytic / Galvanic Cells / Potentials
Shuffled Cards, Messy Desks, and Disorderly Dorm Rooms - Examples of Entropy Increase? Nonsense!  Frank L. Lambert
Simply changing the location of everyday macro objects from an arrangement that we commonly judge as orderly to one that appears disorderly is a "zero change" in the thermodynamic entropy of the objects because the number of accessible energetic microstates in any of them has not been changed.
Lambert, Frank L. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1385.
Nonmajor Courses |
Statistical Mechanics |
Thermodynamics
Visualizing Entropy  Joseph H. Lechner
This report describes two classroom activities that help students visualize the abstract concept of entropy and apply the second law of thermodynamics to real situations.
Lechner, Joseph H. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1382.
Statistical Mechanics |
Thermodynamics
The Ammonia Smoke Fountain: An Interesting Thermodynamic Adventure  M. Dale Alexander
The ammonia smoke fountain demonstration utilizes a modification of the apparatus used in the standard ammonia fountain. The modification allows for the introduction of hydrogen chloride gas into a flask of ammonia rather than water. The flow rate of hydrogen chloride gas into the flask in the smoke fountain is not constant, but periodic; that is, the smoke puffs from the end of the tube. This unexpected behavior elicits an interesting thermodynamic explanation.
Alexander, M. Dale. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 210.
Acids / Bases |
Gases |
Thermodynamics |
Reactions |
Stoichiometry |
Precipitation / Solubility
Heat Flow vs. Cash Flow: A Banking Analogy  Charles M. Wynn, Sr.
An analogy is drawn between the withdrawal of money from an automated teller machine (ATM) and an exothermic chemical reaction.
Wynn, Charles M. Sr. J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 397.
Thermodynamics |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
In Defense of Thermodynamics - An Animate Analogy  Sture Nordholm
In order to illustrate the deepest roots of thermodynamics and its great power and generality, it is applied by way of analogy to human behavior from an economic point of view.
Nordholm, Sture. J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 273.
Thermodynamics
Teaching Chemical Equilibrium and Thermodynamics in Undergraduate General Chemistry Classes  Anil C. Banerjee
Discussion of the conceptual difficulties experienced by undergraduates when dealing with equilibrium and thermodynamics, along with teaching strategies for dealing with these difficulties.
Banerjee, Anil C. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 879.
Equilibrium |
Thermodynamics
Solution-Phase Thermodynamics: A "Spontaneity" Activity  Bindel, Thomas H.
Experimental procedure for verifying the concept of spontaneity using solution chemistry; includes data and analysis.
Bindel, Thomas H. J. Chem. Educ. 1995, 72, 34.
Aqueous Solution Chemistry |
Thermodynamics
The thermodynamics of home-made ice cream.  Gibbon, Donald L.; Kennedy, Keith; Reading, Nathan; Quieroz, Mardsen.
Using the production of ice cream to teach heat capacity, viscosity, and freezing-point reduction.
Gibbon, Donald L.; Kennedy, Keith; Reading, Nathan; Quieroz, Mardsen. J. Chem. Educ. 1992, 69, 658.
Thermodynamics |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Applications of Chemistry
The conversion of chemical energy: Part 1. Technological examples  Wink, Donald J.
When a chemical reaction occurs, the energy of the chemical species may change and energy can be released or absorbed from the surroundings. This can involve the exchange of chemical energy with another kind of energy or with another chemical system.
Wink, Donald J. J. Chem. Educ. 1992, 69, 108.
Reactions |
Thermodynamics |
Electrochemistry |
Photosynthesis
The reusable heat pack   McAfee, Lyle V.; Jumper, Charles F.
A commercial product that can be used to demonstrate thermodynamic principles.
McAfee, Lyle V.; Jumper, Charles F. J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, 780.
Thermodynamics
A call for simplification   Schomaker, Verner; Waser, Jurg
Does "An Instructive Gibbs-Function Problem" unnecessarily confuse even the most capable students? An exchange of letters.
Schomaker, Verner; Waser, Jurg J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, 443.
Thermodynamics
A call for simplification   Peterson, Donald
Does "An Instructive Gibbs-Function Problem" unnecessarily confuse even the most capable students? An exchange of letters.
Peterson, Donald J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, 443.
Thermodynamics |
Reactions
Calculating entropy changes at different extents of reaction  Brosnan, Tim
The Revised Nuffield Chemistry course uses a simple statistical approach to entropy a a unifying idea in its treatment of thermodynamics. It was for these students that the author developed this method of calculating entropy changes at different extents of reaction which are listed here.
Brosnan, Tim J. Chem. Educ. 1990, 67, 48.
Thermodynamics
With Clausius from energy to entropy  Baron, Maximo
Examination of entropy following the route taken by Clausius.
Baron, Maximo J. Chem. Educ. 1989, 66, 1001.
Thermodynamics
Thermodynamics should be built on energy-not on heat and work  Barrow, Gordon M.
This author looks closely at the concepts of heat, work, energy, and the laws of thermodynamics to back up his title argument.
Barrow, Gordon M. J. Chem. Educ. 1988, 65, 122.
Thermodynamics
Thermodynamics and the bounce  Carraher, Charles E., Jr.
Explaining the bouncing of a rubber ball using the laws of thermodynamics.
Carraher, Charles E., Jr. J. Chem. Educ. 1987, 64, 43.
Thermodynamics
Constant properties of systems: A rationale for the inclusion of thermodynamics in a high school chemistry course  Schultz, Ethel L.
Using the zinc / copper system to illustrate how the thermodynamic functions can be introduced gradually and naturally into a course of study.
Schultz, Ethel L. J. Chem. Educ. 1985, 62, 228.
Thermodynamics
Further reflections on heat  Hornack, Frederick M.
Confusion regarding the nature of heat and thermodynamics.
Hornack, Frederick M. J. Chem. Educ. 1984, 61, 869.
Kinetic-Molecular Theory |
Thermodynamics |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
Chemical energy: A learning package  Cohen, Ita; Ben-Zvi, Ruth
Problems associated with the teaching of chemical energy and an instructional package designed to overcome those difficulties.
Cohen, Ita; Ben-Zvi, Ruth J. Chem. Educ. 1982, 59, 656.
Thermodynamics |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
Why thermodynamics should not be taught to freshmen, or who owns the problem?  Battino, Rubin
Thermodynamics should not be taught to freshmen - there are better things to do with the time.
Battino, Rubin J. Chem. Educ. 1979, 56, 520.
Thermodynamics
What thermodynamics should be taught to freshmen, or what is the goal?  Campbell, J. A.
The great majority of students in first-year college courses must try to work problems involving changes in enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs Free Energy.
Campbell, J. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1979, 56, 520.
Thermodynamics
Entropy and rubbery elasticity  Nash, Leonard K.
Thermodynamic analysis of the polymeric molecules of rubber.
Nash, Leonard K. J. Chem. Educ. 1979, 56, 363.
Thermodynamics |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Statistical Mechanics
Brief introduction to the three laws of thermodynamics  Stevenson, Kenneth L.
Brief descriptions of the three laws of thermodynamics.
Stevenson, Kenneth L. J. Chem. Educ. 1975, 52, 330.
Thermodynamics
The first law. For scientists, citizens, poets and philosophers  Bent, Henry A.
Practical experiences and phenomena that serve to illustrate the first law of thermodynamics.
Bent, Henry A. J. Chem. Educ. 1973, 50, 323.
Thermodynamics
Questions [and] Answers  Campbell, J. A.
Seven questions requiring the application of basic principles of chemistry.
Campbell, J. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1972, 49, 769.
Enrichment / Review Materials |
Applications of Chemistry |
Thermodynamics |
Gases |
Astrochemistry
An alternative to free energy for undergraduate instruction  Strong, Laurence E.; Halliwell, H. Frank
It is the purpose of this paper to question the usefulness of the Gibbs function for the student and to propose an alternative based on the use of entropy functions that help the student to focus more sharply on the features of a system that relate to its capacity to change.
Strong, Laurence E.; Halliwell, H. Frank J. Chem. Educ. 1970, 47, 347.
Thermodynamics
Our freshmen like the second law  Craig, Norman C.
The author affirms the place of thermodynamics in the introductory chemistry course and outlines a presentation that has been used with students at this level.
Craig, Norman C. J. Chem. Educ. 1970, 47, 342.
Thermodynamics
The second law - How much, how soon, to how many?  Bent, Henry A.
Discussion of the conceptual components of thermodynamics, their mathematical requirements, and where they might be best placed in the curriculum.
Bent, Henry A. J. Chem. Educ. 1970, 47, 337.
Thermodynamics |
Calorimetry / Thermochemistry
Sealed tube experiments  Campbell, J. A.
Lists and briefly describes a large set of "sealed tube experiments," each of which requires less than five minutes to set-up and clean-up, requires less than five minutes to run, provides dramatic results observable by a large class, and illustrates important chemical concepts.
Campbell, J. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1970, 47, 273.
Thermodynamics |
Crystals / Crystallography |
Solids |
Liquids |
Gases |
Rate Law |
Equilibrium
The use and misuse of the laws of thermodynamics  McGlashan, M. L.
Examines the first and second laws, the usefulness of thermodynamics, the calculation of equilibrium constants, and what entropy does not mean.
McGlashan, M. L. J. Chem. Educ. 1966, 43, 226.
Thermodynamics
Maximum work revisited (Letters)  Mysels, Karol J.
Comments on an earlier "Textbook Error" article that considers at length errors in the calculation of work done in compression or expansion of an ideal gas.
Mysels, Karol J. J. Chem. Educ. 1964, 41, 677.
Thermodynamics |
Gases
Maximum work revisited (Letters)  Bauman, Robert
Comments on an earlier "Textbook Error" article that considers at length errors in the calculation of work done in compression or expansion of an ideal gas.
Bauman, Robert J. Chem. Educ. 1964, 41, 676.
Thermodynamics |
Gases
Maximum work revisited (Letters)  Kokes, Richard J.
Comments on an earlier "Textbook Error" article that considers at length errors in the calculation of work done in compression or expansion of an ideal gas.
Kokes, Richard J. J. Chem. Educ. 1964, 41, 675.
Thermodynamics |
Gases
Reversible and irreversible work: A lecture demonstration  Eberhardt, William H.
This lecture demonstration illustrates the concepts of reversible and irreversible work using a pendulum and attached pan balance.
Eberhardt, William H. J. Chem. Educ. 1964, 41, 483.
Thermodynamics
Teaching the entropy concept  Plumb, Robert C.
Presents a macroscopic lecture demonstration illustrating both potential energy and entropy driving forces and showing their interrelationship.
Plumb, Robert C. J. Chem. Educ. 1964, 41, 254.
Thermodynamics |
Statistical Mechanics
Work of compressing an ideal gas  Bauman, Robert P.
In formulating examples of compression problems there should be an explicit statement that the process is reversible, or at least slow.
Bauman, Robert P. J. Chem. Educ. 1964, 41, 102.
Thermodynamics |
Gases
The second law of thermodynamics: Introduction for beginners at any level  Bent, Henry A.
Examines and offers suggestions for dealing with some of the challenges in teaching thermodynamics at an introductory level.
Bent, Henry A. J. Chem. Educ. 1962, 39, 491.
Thermodynamics