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For the textbook, chapter, and section you specified we found
12 Videos
34 Assessment Questions
10 Molecular Structures
24 Journal Articles
72 Other Resources
Videos: First 3 results
pH of Acetic Acid Derivatives  
The pH of acetic acid, monochloro-, dichloro-, trichloro-, and trifluoroacetic acids are compared.
Acids / Bases |
Carboxylic Acids |
pH |
Physical Properties |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Hydrophobic Effect  
Hydrophobic Effect: Octanoic acid forms a monolayer on the surface of water under certain conditions.
Alkanes / Cycloalkanes |
Carboxylic Acids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions
Paramagnetism  
The paramagnetic properties of oxygen are demonstrated using a strong magnet, and compared with diamagnetic nitrogen.
Magnetic Properties |
Molecular Properties / Structure
View all 12 results
Assessment Questions: First 3 results
Stoichiometry : FormulaFromComp (8 Variations)
Lactic acid is the substance that makes your muscles burn when you've been exercising hard. Lactic acid is composed of 40.0% carbon, 6.7% hydrogen, and 53.3% oxygen by weight. If it has a molar mass of 90 g/mol, what is its molecular formula?
Stoichiometry |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Gases : IDGasFromVelocity (8 Variations)
The following are graphs of molecular velocities versus the relative number of molecules for argon, chlorine, methane and xenon at 300K. Which graph is for argon?
Gases |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Gases : RealGases (6 Variations)
Which gas in the following list will have the greatest deviation from ideal behavior at STP?
Gases |
Molecular Properties / Structure
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Molecular Structures: First 3 results
Diborane B2H6

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Molecular Properties / Structure

Aluminum Fluoride AlF3

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Molecular Properties / Structure

Dinitrogen Difluoride (E) N2F2(E)

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Molecular Properties / Structure |
Stereochemistry |
Nonmetals

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Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Molecular Handshake: Recognition through Weak Noncovalent Interactions  Parvathi S. Murthy
This article traces the development of our thinking about molecular recognition through noncovalent interactions, highlights their salient features, and suggests ways for comprehensive education on this important concept.
Murthy, Parvathi S. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 1010.
Applications of Chemistry |
Biosignaling |
Membranes |
Molecular Recognition |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Chromatography |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Polymerization |
Reactions
A Structure–Activity Investigation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport. An Interdisciplinary Experiment for the First-Year Laboratory  Kerry K. Karukstis, Gerald R. Van Hecke, Katherine A. Roth, and Matthew A. Burden
Investigation in which students measure the effect of several inhibitors (herbicides) on the electron transfer rate in chloroplasts and formulate a hypothesis between the inhibitor's activity and its structure as a means of using a physical technique to measure a chemical process in a biological system.
Karukstis, Kerry K.; Van Hecke, Gerald R.; Roth, Katherine A.; Burden, Matthew A. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 985.
Biophysical Chemistry |
Electrochemistry |
Noncovalent Interactions |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy |
Aromatic Compounds |
Plant Chemistry
Modern Sport and Chemistry: What a Chemically Aware Sports Fanatic Should Know  Guinevere A. Giffin, Steven R. Boone, Renée S. Cole, Scott E. McKay, and Robert Kopitzke
Summary of the chemistry of a variety of sports and athletics; topics include golf, football, tennis, and hockey, as well as sports medicine, performance-enhancing drugs, sports supplements and drinks, and the couch potato.
Giffin, Guinevere A.; Boone, Steven R.; Cole, Renée S.; McKay, Scott E.; Kopitzke, Robert. J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 813.
Consumer Chemistry |
Applications of Chemistry |
Molecular Properties / Structure
View all 24 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Shikimic Acid  William F. Coleman
The molecule for this month comes from the article Isolation of Shikimic Acid from Star Aniseed by Richard Payne and Michael Edmonds. Shikimic acid plays a key role in the biosynthesis of many important natural products including aromatic amino acids, alkaloids, phenolics, and phenylpropanoids. It plays such an important role that one of the key biosynthetic pathways is referred to as the shikimate pathway.
Molecular Properties / Structure
Molecular Models of Indicators  William F. Coleman
The article by Nicholas C. Thomas and Stephen Faulk on "Colorful Chemical Fountains" (1) reminds us that color—the colors of acid–base indicators or of metal complexes—is responsible for many of us developing an interest in chemistry. The featured molecules this month are the acid and base forms of three common indicators–phenolphthalein, methyl orange, and methyl red. These three substances display interesting structural features as the pH-induced transformation from one form to another takes place in three different ways. In the case of phenolphthalein, the lactam ring is cleaved on deprotonation to produce a carboxyl group with the concomitant removal of a proton from a phenolic group. In methyl orange, one of the nitrogen atoms is protonated in the acid form, and that proton is lost in the base form. In methyl red, a carboxylic acid function is deprotonated. There are many other interesting aspects of acid–base indicators. Since most plants and fruits contain pigments that show a color change in some pH range, it is difficult to state with any degree of certainty when these changes were first put to use in a systematic fashion. The Spanish alchemist Arnaldus de Villa Nova (Arnold of Villanova) is purported to have used litmus in the early 14th century. In general systematic use of indicators is traced to the latter half of the nineteenth century with the development of the three synthetic indicators described above. Many students will be familiar with the use of phenolphthalein to identify blood—often shown on the various forensic chemistry TV dramas by dropping some solution on a cotton swab that has been used to pick up some of the sample in question. If the swab turns red we frequently hear "It's blood". The reality of using phenolphthalein in this way is more complicated. The test is presumptive for the presence of blood, but not conclusive. It is not an acid–base reaction but rather, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, relies on hemoglobin to catalyze the oxidation of phenolphthalein. An interesting assignment for students in a high-school or non-majors course would be to have them explore the details of this Kastle–Meyers test to see just what is involved in the correct application of the test, and what factors complicate the process. For example, would tomato juice infused with asparagus juice give a positive Kastle–Meyers test? Historically phenolphthalein was used in a variety of laxatives. Recently that usage has been discontinued due to concern about the carcinogenic nature of the substance. A review of the history of the controversy surrounding the use of phenolphthalein in laxatives would make a good research paper at the high-school level. Lastly, students with some practice building structures and performing calculations might wish to explore the structures of two other forms of phenolphthalein—one found in very acidic solutions, having an orange color, and one found in very basic solutions that is colorless.
Molecular Properties / Structure
Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue  William F. Coleman, Randall J. Wildman
The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage.
Molecular Modeling |
Molecular Properties / Structure
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