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For the textbook, chapter, and section you specified we found
4 Videos
10 Assessment Questions
7 Molecular Structures
20 Journal Articles
21 Other Resources
Videos: First 3 results
Polyurethane Foam in Micro Gravity  
Polyurethane foam is formed in micro gravity (NASA Reduced Gravity Program).
Polymerization
Metallocene Catalyzed Polymerization of Ethylene  
Polymerization chemistry is demonstrated by the reaction between ethylene and a Ziegler-Natta catalyst.
Polymerization |
Catalysis |
Reactions
Formaldehyde Copolymers  
Formaldehyde Copolymers
Electrophilic Substitution |
Phenols |
Polymerization
View all 4 results
Assessment Questions: First 3 results
Radicals (9 Variations)
A collection of 9 assessment questions about Radicals
Addition Reactions |
Free Radicals |
Mechanisms of Reactions |
Reactions |
Aromatic Compounds
MO Theory (11 Variations)
A collection of 11 assessment questions about MO Theory
MO Theory |
Reactions |
Addition Reactions |
Free Radicals |
Alkenes |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy
Covalent Bonding (11 Variations)
A collection of 11 assessment questions about Covalent Bonding
Carboxylic Acids |
Acids / Bases |
Resonance Theory |
Covalent Bonding |
Phenols |
Amines / Ammonium Compounds |
Free Radicals |
Alkenes |
Amides |
Ethers
View all 10 results
Molecular Structures: First 3 results
Nitrogen Trioxide NO3(r)

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Nonmetals |
Free Radicals

Chlorine Monoxide ClO(r)

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Free Radicals |
VSEPR Theory |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Nonmetals

Nitrogen Dioxide NO2(r)

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Free Radicals |
VSEPR Theory |
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Nonmetals

View all 7 results
Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Construction of a Polyaniline Nanofiber Gas Sensor  Shabnam Virji, Bruce H. Weiller, Jiaxing Huang, Richard Blair, Heather Shepherd, Tanya Faltens, Philip C. Haussmann, Richard B. Kaner, and Sarah H. Tolbert
The objectives of this lab are to synthesize different diameter polyaniline nanofibers and compare them as sensor materials. Its advantages include simplicity and low cost, making it suitable for both high school and college students, particularly in departments with modest means.
Virji, Shabnam; Weiller, Bruce H.; Huang, Jiaxing; Blair, Richard; Shepherd, Heather; Faltens, Tanya; Haussmann, Philip C.; Kaner, Richard B.; Tolbert, Sarah H. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1102.
Acids / Bases |
Aromatic Compounds |
Conductivity |
Hydrogen Bonding |
Oxidation / Reduction |
Oxidation State |
pH |
Polymerization |
Synthesis
The Amazingly Versatile Titanocene Derivatives  Donald C. Bowman
Derivatives of titanocene are remarkably versatile in their chemical applications. This article presents a brief review of the derivatives' uses in the fields of polymers, medical oncology, and organic synthesis.
Bowman, Donald C. J. Chem. Educ. 2006, 83, 735.
Applications of Chemistry |
Catalysis |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Organometallics |
Polymerization |
Synthesis
Polymers (Oxford Chemistry Primers No. 85) (David Walton and J. Phillip Lorimer)  John H. Shibata
Although the title suggests a broad, general coverage of polymers, in reality this book focuses primarily on synthesis and the macroscopic properties of polymers. A significant portion of the book emphasizes practical considerations of polymerscommercial aspects determined by the properties of polymers and the industrial processes for polymer synthesis and three-dimensional network formation. In many cases, specific polymer types and materials are described in detail. The concreteness of explicit examples to illustrate the principles of polymerization and the properties of networks and functional polymers are appropriate for readers seeking a practical introduction to polymers.
Shibata, John H. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 533.
Polymerization |
Synthesis
View all 20 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Connected Chemistry  Mike Stieff
Connected Chemistry, a novel learning environment for teaching chemistry, is appropriate for use in both high school and undergraduate chemistry classrooms. Connected Chemistry comprises several molecular simulations designed to enable instructors to teach chemistry using the perspective of emergent phenomena. That is, it allows students to see observed macro-level chemical phenomena, like many other scientific phenomena, as resultant from the interactions of many individual agents on a micro-level. This perspective is especially appropriate to the study of chemistry where the interactions between multitudes of molecules on the atomic level give rise to the macro-level concepts that students study in the classroom. Connected Chemistry comprises molecular simulations embedded in the NetLogo modeling software (1). The collection contains several predesigned simulations of closed chemical systems to teach specific chemistry concepts. Currently, Connected Chemistry contains models for teaching Brønsted Lowry acid base theory, enzyme kinetics, radical polymerization, buffer chemistry, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and crystallization. Instructors and students can individually tailor the predesigned simulations or generate new simulations as they are needed in the context of a particular lesson, classroom, or department.
Acids / Bases |
Gases |
Kinetics |
Nuclear / Radiochemistry |
pH |
Titration / Volumetric Analysis |
Polymerization |
Equilibrium |
Catalysis
Molecular Models of Antioxidants and Radicals  William F. Coleman
This month's featured molecules come from the paper by John M. Berger, Roshniben J. Rana, Hira Javeed, Iqra Javeed, and Sandi L. Schulien (1) describing the use of DPPH to measure antioxidant activity. DPPH was one of the featured molecules in September 2007 (2) and the basics of antioxidant activity were introduced in last month's column (3). In addition, some of the other molecules in the paper are already in the featured molecules collection (4). The remaining structures in the Figure 1 and Table 1 of the paper have been added to the collection. All structures have been optimized at the 6-311G(D,P) level. These molecules suggest a number of possible student activities, some reminiscent of previous columns and some new. (R,R,R)-α-tocopherol is one of the molecules in the mixture that goes by the name vitamin E. These molecules differ in the substituents on the benzene ring and on whether or not there are alternating double bonds in the phytyl tail. In (R,R,R)-α-tocopherol the R's refer to the three chiral carbon atoms in tail while α refers to the substituents on the ring. (R,R,R)-α-Tocopherol is the form found in nature. An interesting literature problem would be to have students learn more about the vitamin E mixture and the differing antioxidant activity of the various constituents. Additionally they could be asked to explore the difference between the word natural as used by a chemist, and "natural" as used on vitamin E supplements. Can students find regulations governing the use of the term "natural"? Can they suggest alternative legislation, and defend their ideas? If students read about vitamin C they will discover that only L-ascorbic acid is useful in the body. It would be interesting to extend the experiment described in the Berger et al. paper (1) to include D-ascorbic acid. How do the antioxidant abilities of the enantiomers, as determined by reaction with DPPH compare? Is this consistent with the behavior in the body? Why or why not? Berger et al. mention two other stable neutral radicals, TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and Fremy's salt. In a reversal from the use of stable radicals to measure antioxidant properties, these two molecules have proven to be very versatile oxidation catalysts in organic synthesis, and would make a rich source of research papers for students in undergraduate organic courses.
Free Radicals |
Natural Products
Biologically Active Exceptions to the Octet Rule  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Lewis Structures |
Free Radicals |
Vitamins
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