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3 Assessment Questions
16 Molecular Structures
16 Journal Articles
14 Other Resources
Assessment Questions: 3 results
Biochemistry : ComplementaryDNA (20 Variations)
Determine the sequence of the complementary DNA strand for the following sequence. (Note: Complementary strands match up 5' ends to 3' ends.)
5'-TAATGAGT-3'

Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
Biochemistry : HBondingDNA (9 Variations)
The structure and replication of DNA are strongly dependent on the hydrogen bonding system present in the double helix. How many functional groups in thymine can participate in hydrogen bonding? (This means all the groups, not just the ones that actually participate in hydrogen bonding in the double helix.)

Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
Biochemistry : Replication (8 Variations)
Which of the following is NOT a feature of replication?
Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
Molecular Structures: First 3 results
uracil C4H4N2O2

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA |
Amides

thymine C5H6N2O2

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA |
Aromatic Compounds |
Amides

dihydro-thymine C5H8N2O2

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Amides |
Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA |
Heterocycles

View all 16 results
Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
UV Thermal Melting Curves of tRNAPhe in the Presence of Ligands  Sarah R. Kirk, Todd P. Silverstein, and Karen L. McFarlane Holman
This article describes a set of experiments in which the thermal unfolding of tRNAPhe is studied with UVvis spectrophotometry. Students examine the effects of magnesium and small molecule ligands on tRNAPhe conformational stability and draw conclusions about tRNAPhe ligand binding modes and the impact of various types of ligands on tRNA structure.
Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; Holman, Karen L. McFarlane. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 674.
Bioinorganic Chemistry |
Bioorganic Chemistry |
Biophysical Chemistry |
Thermal Analysis |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy |
Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
Probing Changes in the Conformation of tRNAPhe: An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory Course  Sarah R. Kirk, Todd P. Silverstein, Karen L. McFarlane Holman, and Buck L. H. Taylor
This guided-inquiry, laboratory course focuses on the biomolecule tRNAPhe and combines biochemistry with elements of bioorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. Throughout the semester students work collaboratively to study tRNAPhe structure and the influence of ligand binding under a variety of conditions using several analytical techniques.
Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; Holman, Karen L. McFarlane; Taylor, Buck L. H. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 666.
Bioinorganic Chemistry |
Bioorganic Chemistry |
Biophysical Chemistry |
Electrophoresis |
Fluorescence Spectroscopy |
UV-Vis Spectroscopy |
Student-Centered Learning |
Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
A 3D Model of Double-Helical DNA Showing Variable Chemical Details  Susan G. Cady
A 3D double-helical DNA model, made by placing beads on a wire and stringing beads through holes in plastic canvas, is described. Suggestions are given to enhance the basic helical frame to show the shapes and sizes of the nitrogenous base rings, 3' and 5' chain termini, and base pair hydrogen bonding. Students can incorporate random or real gene sequence data into their models.
Cady, Susan G. J. Chem. Educ. 2005, 82, 79.
Biotechnology |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Molecular Modeling |
Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
View all 16 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Molecular Models of DNA  William F. Coleman
The featured molecules this month come from the paper by David T. Crouse on the X-ray determination of the structure of DNA. Given that most students are aware of the double helix, it seems appropriate to back up a little and examine the components that give rise to this structure. Accordingly, the molecule collection includes: Purine and pyrimidine, structural precursors of the four bases found in DNA: cytosine (C), thymine (T), adenine (A), and guanine (G) The four corresponding deoxyribonucleosides The four deoxyribonucleotides (the nucleoside monophosphates) A two-base-pair fragment showing the AT and GC hydrogen-bonded complements Several small 24-base-pair DNA fragments polyAT, polyGC, and a random array of bases. The DNA fragments provide a good opportunity to have students explore features of the Jmol and Chime menus. Using the Jmol menu as an example (right-click on the structure to bring up the menu) students can use the measuring tools to get an idea of the length of a complete turn in the DNA, the relative widths of the major and minor grooves, and the diameter of the helix. They can use the coloring schemes to detect the various base pair combinations, and learn to read the code for the random sequence. In Chime they can use the Shapely coloring scheme for this same purpose. Exploring other aspects of the menu will allow students to present the molecules in the various forms, including ribbon and cartoon views. In RNA, thymine is replaced by uracil, and the sugar moiety has an axial hydroxyl group on the carbon atom adjacent to the base binding site (the 2? carbon). The structures of uracil and of uridine monophosphate are included in the molecule collection. Students can use the Web to download and examine more complex DNAs using a site such as the Nucleic Acid Database at Rutgers University.
Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
Cross-Linking in Biology  Robert Hetue
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Molecular Biology
Nucleic Acids  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Nucleic Acids / DNA / RNA
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