TIGER

Other Resources: 26 results
Solutions  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents
Measuring the Composition of a Solution  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents
Ideal Solutions: Raoult's Law  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents
Solution Concentrations Lecture Demonstrations  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents
Dilution of Ingested Glucose  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents
Solution Concentrations  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents
Diluting and Mixing Solutions  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents
Saturated and Supersaturated Solutions  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents |
Precipitation / Solubility
Colligative Properties of Solutions  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents |
Physical Properties
Sugar Solution Density; Canning, Maple Syrup, and Pousse Cafes  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Physical Properties |
Solutions / Solvents
Low Glycemic Index Foods and Blood Glucose Concentration  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents |
Nutrition
Solution Concentrations and Cells  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents |
Biological Cells
Diluting and Mixing I.V. Solutions  Ed Vitz
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents |
Medicinal Chemistry
Dilution in Mixing Zones  Jnelson1
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Solutions / Solvents |
Water / Water Chemistry
Dissolving  American Chemical Society
ACS Science for Kids activities exploring the process of dissolving chemicals in solution.
Water / Water Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents
Soap and Detergent  American Chemical Society
ACS Science for Kids activities explore the properties of soap in aqueous solutions.
Lipids |
Polymerization |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents
Principal Species and pH  Robert M. Hanson
Calculates concentrations of principal species in solutions using JavaScript. You can specify whether "1st-year" methods or mass-charge balance methods are used in the calculations. Solutions can be chosen from the included set or you can design your own.
Acids / Bases |
Titration / Volumetric Analysis |
pH |
Solutions / Solvents
Computer Simulations of Salt Solubility  Victor M. S. Gil, João C. M. Paiva
Computer Simulations of Salt Solubility provides an animated, visual interpretation of the different solubilities of related salts based on simple entropy changes associated with dissolution: configurational disorder and thermal disorder. This animation can also help improve students conceptual understanding of chemical equilibrium before any quantitative interpretation of equilibrium constants is attempted.
Computational Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents |
Thermodynamics |
Equilibrium |
Precipitation / Solubility
Molecular Models of Compounds in Maple Syrup  William F. Coleman
This month's issue of J. Chem. Educ. includes articles by David Ball dealing with the chemical composition of honey (1) and maple syrup (2). The JCE Featured Molecules for this month are drawn from those papers. In prior months we have included sucrose, glucose, and fructose (3), and all of the naturally occurring amino acids (4) in the molecule collection. This month we add the molecules identified in Table 4 of ref 2 as probable contributors to the taste of maple syrup. This group of molecules could serve easily as a starting point for a variety of student activities in the area of taste. Students in non-majors courses could be asked to identify structural similarities and differences among the various molecules and could be introduced to functional groups. Students could look for other foods in which some of these molecules are found, and could begin to develop a list of molecules contributing to flavor. In the penultimate paragraph of the maple syrup paper there is a list of substances used as flavoring agents in artificial (maple) syrup. What molecules are in fenugreek and lovage that might be important in flavoring? What are the structures of the other molecules in that paragraph and what, if any, structural features do they have in common with the featured molecules? Students in organic or biochemistry courses could begin to explore the chemistry of taste in more detail. Good starting points for this work are The Chemistry of Taste: Mechanisms, Behaviors, and Mimics by Peter Given and Dulce Paredes (5) and the Chemical and Engineering News Web site (6), which includes a number of articles on this subject.
Descriptive Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents |
Food Science |
Plant Chemistry
Chemical & Physical Change  American Chemical Society
Everything you see and touch has the ability to change. Sometimes substances change to form new substances. This is called a chemical change. Other times substances change but keep the same identity. This is called a physical change. Try these activities to learn more about chemical and physical change.
Acids / Bases |
Reactions |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents |
Consumer Chemistry
Art-ACS Science for Kids  American Chemical Society
ACS Science for Kids activities exploring the chemistry involved in art.
Dyes / Pigments |
Applications of Chemistry |
Solutions / Solvents |
Physical Properties
Percent Yield  Ed Vitz, John W. Moore
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Synthesis
Molecular Models of Products and Reactants from Suzuki and Heck Syntheses  William F. Coleman
Our Featured Molecules this month come from the paper by Evangelos Aktoudianakis, Elton Chan, Amanda R. Edward, Isabel Jarosz, Vicki Lee, Leo Mui, Sonya S. Thatipamala, and Andrew P. Dicks (1), in which they describe the synthesis of 4-phenylphenol using an aqueous-based Suzuki reaction. The authors describe the various ways in which this reaction addresses concerns of green chemistry, and point out that their product bears structural similarity to two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), felbinac and diflunisal. A number of molecules from this paper and its online supplemental material have been added to the Featured Molecules collection. Students will first notice that the aromatic rings in the molecules based on a biphenyl backbone are non-planar, as is the case in biphenyl. If they look carefully at diflunisal, they will notice that the carbon atoms are in a different chemical environment. One way in which to see the effect of these differing environments is to examine the effect of atom charge on the energies of the carbon 1s orbitals. Figure 1 shows this effect using charges and energies from an HF/631-G(d) calculation. A reasonable question to ask students would be to assign each of the data points to the appropriate carbon atom. As an extension of this exercise students could produce similar plots using different computational schemes. Are the results the same; are they parallel. This would be a useful problem when dealing with the tricky question of exactly what is meant by atom charge in electronic structure calculations. Students with more expertise in organic chemistry could explore extending the synthesis of 4-phenylphenol to produce more complex bi- and polyphenyl-based drugs. This may well be the first time that they have seen coupling reactions such as the Suzuki and Heck reactions. Students in introductory and non-science-major courses might well find the NSAIDs to be an interesting group of molecules, and could be asked to find information on the variety of molecules that display the anti-inflammatory properties associated with NSAIDs. Do they find structural similarities? Are there various classes of NSAIDs? Are they familiar with any of these molecules? Have they taken any NSAIDs? If so, for what reason? Is there any controversy about any of the NSAIDs? As with all of the molecules in the Featured Molecules collections, those added this month provide us with a number of ways of showing students the practical relevance of what they sometime see only as lines on a page. Molecules do matter.
Synthesis
Characteristics of Materials  American Chemical Society
What makes diapers absorbent? Is peanut butter stickier than syrup or jelly? Strong, stretchy, sticky, or sweet—everything around us has special properties which make them unique. See if you can identify and compare the characteristics of materials.
Industrial Chemistry |
Physical Properties |
Reactions |
Consumer Chemistry |
Gases |
Carbohydrates |
Proteins / Peptides |
Crystals / Crystallography |
Water / Water Chemistry |
Plant Chemistry |
Dyes / Pigments |
Lipids |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Applications of Chemistry |
Nutrition |
Acids / Bases |
Chromatography |
Magnetic Properties |
Metals |
Polymerization |
Solutions / Solvents |
Descriptive Chemistry |
Food Science
Creative Chemistry  
Volume 04, issue 15 of a series of leaflets covering subjects of interest to students of elementary chemistry distributed in 1929 - 1932.
Applications of Chemistry |
Synthesis
Molecular Models of Plant Hormones  William F. Coleman
The paper "Synthesis of Plant Auxin Derivatives and Their Effects on Ceratopteris richardii" by Corey E. Stilts and Roxanne Fisher describing an experiment begun in the organic labs and completed in a biochemistry cell biology lab provides the featured molecules for this month. The molecules in Figure 1 of that paper have been added to the collection. There is nothing particularly surprising about their structures, but students might be interested in seeing whether they can determine any structure/regulating effect relationships as the number of synthesized auxin derivatives grows. Additionally, students with little or no biochemistry background might wish to explore other systems that act as growth regulating hormones in plants, as an introduction to the variety of molecular structures that can display such bioactivity. Such molecules range from the very simple, ethene, to the adenine-derived cytokinins (an example of which, zealtin, is shown here) and the brassinosteroids. Brassinolide, a commonly occurring brassin, is also shown. These latter two structures have also been added to the molecule collection. All of the structures have been optimized at the HF/6-31G(d) level.
Synthesis |
Biological Cells |
Hormones |
Bioorganic Chemistry