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For the textbook, chapter, and section you specified we found
4 Videos
6 Assessment Questions
13 Molecular Structures
133 Journal Articles
17 Other Resources
Videos: First 3 results
Atmospheric Pollution  
The formation and effects of acid rain and other pollutants are simulated.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Gases
Ozone: Absorbance of UV Light  
Ozone is produced. Exposure to a shortwave ultraviolet source causes the ozone to cast a shadow against a fluorescent yellow background.
Atmospheric Chemistry |
Photochemistry
Atmosphere  
Topics associated with the atmosphere include atmospheric pressure, pollution and the role of ozone.
Gases |
Atmospheric Chemistry
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Assessment Questions: First 3 results
Special_Topics : AirPollutants (20 Variations)
Which of the following air pollutants can be described as a photochemically active free radical that contributes to acid rain and respiratory irritation?
Atmospheric Chemistry
Special_Topics : GeneralAcidRain (20 Variations)
Which of the following statements about acid rain is the most correct?
Atmospheric Chemistry
Special_Topics : RainFallpH (20 Variations)
The rainfall in central Wisconsin has a pH of 4.8 (National Atmospheric Deposition Program). Take a look at the EPA webpage Effects of Acid Rain: Lakes & Streams. This site has a chart of the pH at which several aquatic species begin to suffer. Determine which of the following species will be most affected by rainfall of this acidity if the lakes and streams in central Wisconsin aren't buffered enough to neutralize some of the acid. (There may be more than one correct answer.)
Atmospheric Chemistry
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Molecular Structures: First 3 results
Carbon Dioxide CO2

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Atmospheric Chemistry

Nitrous Oxide N2O

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Atmospheric Chemistry |
Nonmetals |
Resonance Theory

Methane CH4

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Alkanes / Cycloalkanes |
VSEPR Theory |
Atmospheric Chemistry

View all 13 results
Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Greener Alternative to Qualitative Analysis for Cations without H2S and Other Sulfur-Containing Compounds  Indu Tucker Sidhwani and Sushmita Chowdhury
The classic technique for the qualitative analysis of inorganic salts and mixtures relies on highly toxic hydrogen sulfide. Increasing environmental awareness has prompted the development of a green scheme for the detection of cations by spot tests that is simple and fast.
Sidhwani, Indu Tucker; Chowdhury, Sushmita. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1099.
Green Chemistry |
Qualitative Analysis |
Separation Science
Developing and Disseminating NOP: An Online, Open-Access, Organic Chemistry Teaching Resource To Integrate Sustainability Concepts in the Laboratory  Johannes Ranke, Müfit Bahadir, Marco Eissen, and Burkhard König
Describes a project that identifies parameters for sustainable practices in organic chemistry laboratories, including the atom economy and energy efficiency of chemical transformations, questions of waste and renewable feedstocks, toxicity and ecotoxicity, and safety measures.
Ranke, Johannes; Bahadir, Müfit; Eissen, Marco; König, Burkhard. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1000.
Green Chemistry |
Synthesis |
Toxicology
Determination of the Formula of a Hydrate: A Greener Alternative  Marc A. Klingshirn, Allison F. Wyatt, Robert M. Hanson, and Gary O. Spessard
This article describes how the principles of green chemistry were applied to a first-semester, general chemistry courses, specifically in relation to the determination of the formula of a copper hydrate salt that changes color when dehydrated and is easily rehydrated with steam.
Klingshirn, Marc A.; Wyatt, Allison F.; Hanson, Robert M.; Spessard, Gary O. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 819.
Gravimetric Analysis |
Green Chemistry |
Solids |
Stoichiometry
View all 133 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Molecular Models of Reactants and Products from an Asymmetric Synthesis of a Chiral Carboxylic Acid  William F. Coleman
Our JCE Featured Molecules for this month come from the paper by Thomas E. Smith, David P. Richardson, George A. Truran, Katherine Belecki, and Megumi Onishi (1). The authors describe the use of a chiral auxiliary, 4-benzyl-2-oxazolidinone, in the synthesis of a chiral carboxylic acid. The majority of the molecules used in the experiment, together with several of the pharmaceuticals mentioned in the paper, have been added to our molecule collection. In many instances multiple enantiomeric and diastereomeric forms of the molecules have been included. This experiment could easily be extended to incorporate various aspects of computation for use in an advanced organic or integrated laboratory. Here are some possible exercises using the R and S forms of the 4-benzyl-2-oxazolidinone as the authors point out that both forms are available commercially. Calculation of the optimized structures and energies of the enantiomers at the HF/631-G(d) level using Gaussian03 (2) produces the results shown in Table 1. Evaluation of the vibrational frequencies results in no imaginary frequencies and the 66 real frequencies are identical for the two forms. Examination of the computed IR spectra also shows them to be identical. Additionally, the Raman and NMR spectra can be calculated for the enantiomers and compared to experimental values and spectral patterns. A tool that is becoming increasingly important for assigning absolute configuration is vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). Although the vibrational spectra of an enantiomeric pair are identical, the VCD spectra show opposite signs, as shown in Figure 1. One can imagine a synthesis, using an unknown enantiomer of the chiral auxiliary, followed by calculations of the electronic and vibrational properties of all of the intermediates and the product, and determination of absolute configuration of reactants and products by comparison of experimental and computed VCD spectra. Using a viewer capable of displaying two molecules that can be moved independently, students could more easily visualize the origin of the enantiomeric preference in the reaction between the chelated enolate and allyl iodide.
Green Chemistry
Importance of Air  
Volume 03, issue 08 of a series of leaflets covering subjects of interest to students of elementary chemistry distributed in 1929 - 1932.
Atmospheric Chemistry
The Air  
Volume 05, issue 09 of a series of leaflets covering subjects of interest to students of elementary chemistry distributed in 1929 - 1932.
Atmospheric Chemistry
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