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For the textbook, chapter, and section you specified we found
4 Videos
4 Molecular Structures
277 Journal Articles
26 Other Resources
Videos: First 3 results
Safety Match Chemistry: Red Phosphorus and Potassium Chlorate  
The chemical reaction that underlies common safety matches is demonstrated.
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
Chemiluminescence  
Luminol and light sticks are demonstrated.
Thermodynamics |
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
Polymers  
Formation of formaldehyde copolymers, nylon rope, high and low density polyethylene, combustion of polyethylene and polystyrene, Beilstein test, formation of solid latex, cleaning oil spills, slime, solid foams, super absorbent polymer, formation of polyurethane foam under normal and micro gravity, and construction of a rod climbing apparatus are demonstrated.
Polymerization |
Reactions |
Applications of Chemistry |
Consumer Chemistry
View all 4 results
Molecular Structures: First 3 results
D-amphetamine C9H13N

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Amines / Ammonium Compounds |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Aromatic Compounds |
Acids / Bases

diazepam C16H13ClN2O

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

Heterocycles |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Amides |
Aromatic Compounds |
Acids / Bases

Boric Acid B(OH)3

3D Structure

Link to PubChem

VSEPR Theory |
Metalloids / Semimetals |
Consumer Chemistry

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Journal Articles: First 3 results.
Pedagogies:
Molecular Models of Peroxides and Albendazoles  William F. Coleman
This month's Featured Molecules are albendazole and benzoyl peroxide.
Coleman, William F. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1710.
Consumer Chemistry |
Molecular Properties / Structure |
Molecular Modeling
A Web-Based Interactive Module to Teach Acid–Base Principles of Drug Action  Maria A. Hernandez and Jolanta Czerwinska
Describes interactive compressed video teleconferencing as the distance learning format for an entry-level doctor of pharmacy program.
Hernandez, Maria A.; Czerwinska, Jolanta. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1704.
Acids / Bases |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals
Real-World Topics: Medicinal Chemistry  Arrietta Clauss
Instructors often look for real-world topics that interest students when designing labs and preparing lectures. The chemistry associated with drugs is a fertile area, and the archives of the Journal can be a resource for interesting drug-related activities to enhance student learning.
Clauss, Arrietta. J. Chem. Educ. 2008, 85, 1657.
Enrichment / Review Materials |
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Medicinal Chemistry |
Applications of Chemistry
View all 277 articles
Other Resources: First 3 results
Molecular Models of Real and Mock Illicit Drugs from a Forensic Chemistry Activity  William F. Coleman
The Featured Molecules for this month come from the paper by Shawn Hasan, Deborah Bromfield-Lee, Maria T. Oliver-Hoyo, and Jose A. Cintron-Maldonado (1). The authors describe a forensic chemistry exercise in which model compounds are used to simulate the behavior of various drugs in a series of chemical tests. Structures of a number of the chemicals used in the experiment, and several of the drugs they are serving as proxy for, have been added to the molecule collection. Other substances used in the experiment are already part of the collection, including caffeine and aspirin. One structure that may be both intriguing and confusing to students is that of chlorpromazine (Thorazine, Figure 1). A majority of students might well expect the ring portion of the molecule to show a planar structure. This is not what is found from calculations at the HF/6311++G(d,p) level in both the gas phase and in water. Instead, the three rings are in a V-like formation with a deformation of approximately 50 degrees from planarity. Tracking down the source of this non-planarity would be a useful computational exercise. Does it arise from the presence of the alkyl chain (steric effect), from the chloro group (electronic effect), or from electronic effects involving the elements of the heterocyclic ring? As a starting point to addressing these questions, students could be introduced to the use of model compounds in computation. One such compound would be the parent ring system phenothiazine (Figure 2). That molecule contains neither a chloro substituent nor an extended alkyl group. Is it also found to be non-planar? Is the deformation angle the same, larger, or smaller than in chlorpromazine? Does the addition of chloro group to phenothiazene change the angle significantly? What about the addition of an alkyl group? If the model compound is forced to be planar are all of the vibrational frequencies real (positive)? If not, what type of deformation is suggested by the imaginary (negative) vibration?
Drugs / Pharmaceuticals |
Forensic Chemistry
Sunscreens  William F. Coleman
Reinforcing the "Heath and Wellness" theme of National Chemistry Week 2004, the featured molecules for this month are all found in commercial sunscreens, or in the synthesis of sunscreen materials. The paper by Stabile and Dicks introduces students of organic chemistry to the synthesis of cinnamate esters used in sunscreen products. Several of the papers referenced by those authors, most notably a paper by Doris Kimbrough (J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 51?53), present the structures of additional sunscreen components. Although the details of the synthesis are beyond the scope of most introductory courses, these molecules present an excellent opportunity for introducing students to the absorption of radiation that is far more relevant to their lives than the line spectra of hydrogen and other atoms. Such a discussion could be extended to include more delocalized dyes such as those frequently studied in physical chemistry courses as a test of particle-in-a-box models, and students could be asked about those molecules as sunscreens, which raises an interesting intersection between aesthetics and spectroscopy.
Consumer Chemistry
Molecular Models of Candy Components  William F. Coleman
This month's Featured Molecules come from the paper "A Spoonful of C12H22O11 Makes the Chemistry Go Down: Candy Motivations in the High School Chemistry Classroom" by Fanny K Ennever on using candy to illustrate various principles. They include sucrose and the invert sugar that results from the hydrolysis of sucrose. Students should look for structural similarities between sucrose and the hydrolysis products glucose and fructose, and verify that all three are indeed hydrates of carbon. They should also inspect the models to see whether the position of the substituents in the five and six membered rings are the same in the sucrose and in the hydrolysis products. Also included are two esters important in fruit flavoring of candies. Flavor and aroma are inexorably intertwined in the taste experience and no single compound is responsible for that experience. Methyl cinnamate, included here, is one of over 100 esters, and over 300 compounds, involved in the taste of strawberries (1). Isoamyl acetate is a major component of the taste of bananas. Lastly, chocolate, perhaps nothing else need be said. There is a great deal of confusion in the popular press and on the internet between theobromine, found in cocoa beans, and caffeine. Both molecules are included here and students should easily see why the two might be confused. Consequently there are many exaggerated claims about caffeine in chocolate. An interesting assignment would be for teams of students to find reliable data on the physiological effects of these similar molecules, and to find good analyses on the actual level of caffeine in cocoa beans, versus the amount added in the candy production process, if any.
Consumer Chemistry |
Molecular Modeling
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