TIGER

Videos: 6 results
Paramagnetism  
The paramagnetic properties of oxygen are demonstrated using a strong magnet, and compared with diamagnetic nitrogen.
Magnetic Properties |
Molecular Properties / Structure
Paramagnetism: Compounds  
Vials of a number of compounds (NaCl, MnSO4, FeSO4, CoCl2, NiSO4, ZnSO4, K4Fe(CN)6, [Co(NH3)6]Cl3, [Ni(NH3)6]Cl2, and H2O) are hung from a thread. When a magnet is brought near, some of the vials are attracted.
Magnetic Properties |
Atomic Properties / Structure
Paramagnetism: Oxidation States of Manganese  
Manganese(III) oxide, with 4 unpaired electrons per Mn atom, is more strongly attracted to a magnet than is manganese(IV) oxide, with only 3 unpaired electrons per Mn atom. Potassium permanganate, a compound of Mn(VII), has no unpaired electrons and is not attracted to a magnet.
Magnetic Properties |
Atomic Properties / Structure
Ferrimagnetism  
Precipitation reactions are used to produce iron(III) oxide (Fe2O3 called hematite) and mixed iron(II)/iron(III) oxide (Fe3O4 called magnetite). The particles in the slurry of hematite are not attracted to a magnet, but the particles in the slurry of magnetite are.
Magnetic Properties |
Atomic Properties / Structure
Paramagnetism: Nitrogen and Oxygen  
A magnet is shown to strongly attract a pair of metal tongs. The magnet has no visible effect on liquid nitrogen, but when pale blue liquid oxygen is poured near the poles of the magnet, it shows definite attraction.
Magnetic Properties |
Atomic Properties / Structure |
Liquids
Ferrofluid  
A magnet placed just below a dish containing ferrofluid generates an array of spikes in the fluid.
Liquids |
Magnetic Properties |
Metals |
Atomic Properties / Structure