27 Results
Cross-Linking   
(Other (1))
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Synthetic Macromolecules: Some Applied Organic Chemistry   
(Other (1))
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Polysaccharides   
(Other (1))
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Condensation Polymers   
(Other (1))
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Addition Polymers   
(Other (1))
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
Formaldehyde Copolymers   
(Movie/Animation, Audio/Visual (3))
Formaldehyde Copolymers
Metallocene Catalyzed Polymerization of Ethylene   
(Movie/Animation, Audio/Visual (3))
Polymerization chemistry is demonstrated by the reaction between ethylene and a Ziegler-Natta catalyst.
Polyurethane Foam in Micro Gravity   
(Movie/Animation, Audio/Visual (2))
Polyurethane foam is formed in micro gravity (NASA Reduced Gravity Program).
Polymers   
(Movie/Animation, Audio/Visual (14))
Formation of formaldehyde copolymers, nylon rope, high and low density polyethylene, combustion of polyethylene and polystyrene, Beilstein test, formation of solid latex, cleaning oil spills, slime, solid foams, super absorbent polymer, formation of polyurethane foam under normal and micro gravity, and construction of a rod climbing apparatus are demonstrated.
Special_Topics : RecycledProducts (15 Variations)   
(Assessment Material (1))
Use the EcoRecycle Information Sheets at the Ecorecycle Victoria Plastics Recycling website to answer the following question. (Scroll down to the table called "Some uses for plastics and recycled plastics in Australia".)

Which of the following products can be made from recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET)?

NOTE: If the link above is no longer active, click here for the information.

Special_Topics : PlasticRecycling (20 Variations)   
(Assessment Material (1))
Which of the following statements is not one of the reasons usually given in support of recycling plastics?
Special_Topics : PolymerType (21 Variations)   
(Assessment Material (1))
Identify the following polymer as a condensation or addition polymer. Is the polymer composed of single type of monomer or is it a copolymer?
Special_Topics : CondAddMonomers (19 Variations)   
(Assessment Material (1))
Which of the following compounds are more likely to be a part of an addition polymer? (Make sure you can see all of all three structures.)
Special_Topics : IDMonomerFromPoly (20 Variations)   
(Assessment Material (1))
Identify the monomer used to produce the following polymer.
Special_Topics : Copolymerization (20 Variations)   
(Assessment Material (1))
Identify the polymer produced from the polymerization of glycolic acid.
Special_Topics : BiopolyFromMonomer (20 Variations)   
(Assessment Material (1))
Match each of the following biomolecules to the type of biopolymer it will form.
Molecular Models of Polymers Used in Sports Equipment   
(Article (1))
In keeping with the 2008 National Chemistry Week theme of Having a Ball with Chemistry, the Featured Molecules this month are a number of monomers and their associated polymers taken from a paper by Sandy Van Natta and John P. Williams on polymers used in making equipment for a variety of high-impact sports (1). The molecules provide students with an introduction to an important area of applied chemistry and also enable them to examine complex structures using the models they have seen applied to small molecules.It is certainly instructive for students to build small polymer fragments using molecular model kits. Holding a model of n-decane, for example, and twisting it in various ways, provides real insight into the multiplicity of conformations available to supermolecules of polyethylene. Computer-based 3-dimensional structure drawing and visualization programs make it possible to construct large oligomers of known polymers and to begin to explore structural properties of new systems. Two such programs, free for academic use, are DSVisualizer and ArgusLab (2). DSVisualizer includes a useful set of tools for building and viewing structures and a clean geometry option that applies a Dreiding-like force field. ArgusLab adds the ability to perform both molecular mechanics and semi-empirical geometry optimization and to display various molecular surfaces. Using ArgusLab, or a similar program, students can explore the relative energies of various conformations of the substances they have built electronically. Students who are being introduced to molecular modeling and the use of more sophisticated software can easily explore the effects of the modeling and convergence parameters on the stable structures that are found, and can begin to explore the difference between global and local minima on a molecular potential energy surface. Using the conformational search program in HyperChem 7.5 on a tetramer of vinyl chloride (terminated with H; of SRRS stereochemistry; only CCCC torsions varied), approximately half of the 500 structures examined fell within 6 kcal/mol of the lowest energy structure (3). This number would increase significantly if other torsion angles were included.The use of computational software allows us to introduce students in introductory chemistry to the idea of multiple conformations, which is so important in biochemistry and much of organic chemistry. In teaching ideas behind conformational stability care should be taken when attributing conformational stability solely to non-bonded repulsions between peripheral atoms on adjacent carbon atoms. Weinhold and co-workers have recently presented strong evidence that the stability of the staggered conformer of ethane relative to the eclipsed form arises from more favorable interactions of C-H sigma bonding orbitals on adjacent carbons (4). The multiplicity of such interactions could well be responsible for conformational stability in more complex systems. Any discussion of conformational stability should also introduce students to the ultimate conformational problem, the folding of proteins and to the Folding@home project (5).
Soap and Detergent   
(Activity, Instructional Material (9))
ACS Science for Kids activities explore the properties of soap in aqueous solutions.
Characteristics of Materials   
(Activity, Instructional Material (7), Test, Assessment Material (15))
What makes diapers absorbent? Is peanut butter stickier than syrup or jelly? Strong, stretchy, sticky, or sweet—everything around us has special properties which make them unique. See if you can identify and compare the characteristics of materials.
Toys-ACS Science for Kids   
(Activity, Instructional Material (6))
ACS Science for Kids activities explore how chemistry can be used to make toys.
Polymers-Characteristics of Materials   
(Activity, Instructional Material (6))
ACS Science for Kids explores the properties of polymers.
Slime and Goo   
(Activity, Instructional Material (5))
ACS Science for Kids activities exploring the properties of polymers.
Bisphenol A   
()
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
BIODEGRADABLE PLASTICS   
()
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.
ChemPaths 104 W Jan 26   
()
Today in Chem 104: * Lecture: Organic Chemistry; Polymers * Reading: Kotz: Ch. 10, Sec. 5 Moore: Ch 12, Sec 5-6 * Homework #2 due 11:55pm F Jan 28. * Quiz 1 in 2nd Discussion section
ChemPaths 104 F Jan 28   
()
Today in Chem 104: * Lecture: Polymers; Problem-Solving Session (email questions or topics to Prof. Moore jwmoore@chem.wisc.edu by 9am today) * No reading assigned for today. * Homework #2 due 11:55pm Today!
The Origin of Nylon   
()
A section of ChemPrime, the Chemical Educations Digital Library's free General Chemistry textbook.